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Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

  1. Top of page
  2. Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids
  3. Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis
  4. Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy
  5. Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020
  6. Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction
  7. Biography

Roshdy E, Rajaratnam V, Maitra S, Sabry M, Allah AS, Al-Hendy A. Treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids with green tea extract: A pilot randomized controlled clinical study. Int J Women's Health 2013;5:477-486.

Thirty-three women with symptomatic uterine fibroids measuring 2 cm or larger by transvaginal ultrasound were randomized to a daily oral treatment with 800 mg of green tea extract or placebo for 4 months. Participants attended visits and completed the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire, a fibroid-specific health-related quality of life (QOL) scale[1] that assesses bleeding and perceived effects of fibroids on QOL. Women in the green tea group showed a significant decrease in fibroid volume and severity of symptoms—and a significant improvement in QOL compared with the placebo group. No adverse effects were detected.

  • 1
    Spies JB, Coyne K, Guaou Guaou N, Boyle D, Skyrnarz-Murphy K, Gonzalves SM. The UFS-QOL, a new disease-specific symptom and health-related quality of life questionnaire for leiomyomata. Obstet Gynecol. 2002;99:290-300.

Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis

  1. Top of page
  2. Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids
  3. Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis
  4. Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy
  5. Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020
  6. Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction
  7. Biography

Menard JP. Antibacterial treatment of bacterial vaginosis: Current and emerging therapies. Int J Women's Health. 2011;3:295-305.

Interest in bacterial vaginosis (BV) continues to grow as ongoing research links BV with several gynecologic and obstetric morbidities and definitive treatments remain elusive. Menard reviews the efficacy of well-known therapies such as metronidazole, clindamycin, and tinidazole, and scrutinizes the literature comparing these drugs head-to-head. He discusses prevention of recurrence, novel drug delivery systems, and acidification of the vagina. A discussion on the concurrence of BV in women with Candida vaginitis makes a good argument for treating BV simultaneously with an antifungal and metronidazole. Emerging therapies include some essential oils having antiseptic properties, prebiotics, and probiotics. For midwives who see women with chronic and recurrent BV, this review may offer some hope and new therapies to consider.

Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy

  1. Top of page
  2. Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids
  3. Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis
  4. Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy
  5. Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020
  6. Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction
  7. Biography

Igarashi T. Physical and psychological effects of aromatherapy inhalation on pregnant women: A randomized controlled trial. J Altern Complement Med. 2013;19(10):805-810.

Igarashi used the Profile of Mood States questionnaire to assess physical and psychological effects of inhaled aromatherapy on pregnant women using essential oils high in linalool and linalyl acetate (eg, lavender, petitgrain, and bergamot). Both linalool and linalyl acetate are considered safe to use in pregnancy. Though blinding was not possible, 13 participants at 28 weeks’ gestation were randomly assigned to an aromatherapy or a control group. Activity of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves was measured using a portable heart rate monitor. Although the aromatherapy was effective for improving temporary mood, increasing parasympathetic activity, and relaxing effects, Igarashi expressed the need for further study.

Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020

  1. Top of page
  2. Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids
  3. Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis
  4. Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy
  5. Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020
  6. Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction
  7. Biography

Dall TM, Chakrabarti R, Storm MV, Elwell EC, Rayburn WF. Estimated demand for women's health services by 2020. J Women's Health. 2013;22(7):643-647.

Authors used a simulation model, based on national utilization standards, to project demands for women's health services in each state by 2020. Data included descriptions of services provided by the 2010 American Medical Association Masterfile; thus, only physician data were surveyed. A representative population sample of women was obtained from the US Census Bureau and combined with health profile data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Health-seeking behaviors were generated from about 70,000 women from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The overall projection for women's health services is forecast to grow by 6% between 2010 and 2020. Most of the growth in the female population will occur in women aged 65 years and older, a group who uses fewer women's health services. Most of the demand for women's health care providers is expected to stem from 3 sectors: states experiencing rapid population growth (eg, Texas, Florida), some Western states due to an historic imbalance of women's health providers, and a growing population of Hispanic women in the United States. Authors state that the challenge for certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) is the lack of state-level data to identify those CNMs who are self-employed and those CNMs who are working with physician practices. States need strategies to encourage more women's health providers to work in underserved communities. Of note, this study was supported in part by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction

  1. Top of page
  2. Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids
  3. Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis
  4. Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy
  5. Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020
  6. Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction
  7. Biography

Azar M, Bradbury-Jones C, Kroll T. Patterns of help-seeking in women when problems arise in their sexual life: A discussion paper. J Clin Nursing. 2013;22(23–24):35873596.

A literature review was conducted using Vogel's Model to frame the extraction of data from peer-reviewed papers and organize a discussion. Vogel's Model comprises encoding and interpreting, generating options, decision making, and evaluation of behavior. Authors found key concerns associated with help-seeking behavior were women's personal awareness and interaction with their environment. Women's health care providers can focus on developing public awareness, enriching women's empowerment, and providing effective sexual health care.

Biography

  1. Top of page
  2. Green Tea Extract Shows Promise for Treatment of Uterine Fibroids
  3. Emerging Therapies for Bacterial Vaginosis
  4. Further Study Needed to Show Clear Benefit of Aromatherapy for Stress Reduction in Pregnancy
  5. Larger Workforce Needed to Meet Increased Demands for Women's Health Services in 2020
  6. Qualitative Study Explores Help-Seeking Behaviors in Women With Sexual Dysfunction
  7. Biography
  • Sharon Bond, CNM, PhD, FACNM, is an associate professor at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), College of Nursing. She teaches in the Doctor of Nursing Program,, researches cervical cancer prevention, and is in clinical practice at MUSC Women's Health and Planned Parenthood.