STED microscopy of living cells – new frontiers in membrane and neurobiology

Authors

  • Christian Eggeling,

    Corresponding author
    1. Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    • Department of Nanobiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen, Germany
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  • Katrin I. Willig,

    1. Department of Nanobiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen, Germany
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  • Francisco J. Barrantes

    1. Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Institute of Biomedical Research (BIOMED) UCA–CONICET, Catholic University of Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Christian Eggeling, Department of Nanobiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen, Germany. E-mail: ceggeli@gwdg.de

Abstract

Recent developments in fluorescence far-field microscopy such as STED microscopy have accomplished observation of the living cell with a spatial resolution far below the diffraction limit. Here, we briefly review the current approaches to super-resolution optical microscopy and present the implementation of STED microscopy for novel insights into live cell mechanisms, with a focus on neurobiology and plasma membrane dynamics.

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