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Journal of Neurochemistry

Cover image for Vol. 130 Issue 6

September 2014

Volume 130, Issue 6

Pages i–viii, 729–856

  1. Issue Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
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      Issue Cover (September 2014)

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12583

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front cover: Quetiapine (QTP) improved cell number of GABAergic neurons in the cortex of aging mice. The image shows GAD65/67-positive cells in brain sections of 12 months old mice. J. Neurochem. 2014, vol. 130 (6), pp. 780–789.

      Read the full article on doi: 10.1111/jnc.12771

  2. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
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      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12584

  3. IN THIS ISSUE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
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      In this Issue (pages iii–viii)

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12585

  4. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
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      GFAP variants in health and disease: stars of the brain… and gut (pages 729–732)

      Susan M. Sullivan

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12754

      Read the full article ‘Enteric GFAP expression and phosphorylation in Parkinson's disease’ on page 805.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
    1. Bioenergetics & Metabolism

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      Pre-treatment with the synthetic antioxidant T-butyl bisphenol protects cerebral tissues from experimental ischemia reperfusion injury (pages 733–747)

      Thi Thuy Hong Duong, Belal Chami, Aisling C. McMahon, Genevieve M. Fong, Joanne M. Dennis, Saul B. Freedman and Paul K. Witting

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12747

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      We demonstrate that pre-treatment with ditert-butyl bisphenol(Di-t-Bu-BP) inhibits lipid, protein, and total thiol oxidation and decreases caspase activation and infarct size in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (2 h) and reperfusion (24 h) injury. These data suggest that inhibition of oxidative stress contributes significantly to neuroprotection.

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      Functional characterization of the S41Y (C2755A) polymorphism of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (pages 748–758)

      Nurgul Carkaci-Salli, Ugur Salli, Izel Tekin, Jeremy A. Hengst, Moe K. Zhao, T. Lee Gilman, Anne M. Andrews and Kent E. Vrana

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12779

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      We report the functional implications of a polymorphic human tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene associated with depression and bipolar disorder. The polymorphic enzyme (serine-41 converted to tyrosine) has increased activity, but decreased enzyme stability and serotonin production. Moreover, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the mutant enzyme is decreased suggesting modified regulation of the S41Y variant leading to altered serotonin.

    3. Neuroinflammation & Neuroimmunology

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      Endothelin-1 increases the expression of VEGF-R1/Flt-1 receptors in rat cultured astrocytes through ETB receptors (pages 759–769)

      Yutaka Koyama, Mio Hayashi, Ryuji Nagae, Shogo Tokuyama and Tomohiro Konishi

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12770

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      To clarify the regulatory mechanisms of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were examined in rat cultured astrocytes. Effects of selective VEGF-R1 and R2 agonist showed that these receptors were linked to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Treatment with ET-1 increased expression of VEGF-R1, which was mediated by ETB receptors. Pre-treatment with ET-1 potentiated the VEGF-R1-mediated activations of FAK and ERK1/2. These findings suggest that ET-1 induces up-regulation of VEGF-R1 receptors in astrocytes.

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      The anti-seizure drugs vinpocetine and carbamazepine, but not valproic acid, reduce inflammatory IL-1β and TNF-α expression in rat hippocampus (pages 770–779)

      Carlos D. Gómez, Rudolf M. Buijs and María Sitges

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12784

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      The mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs like vinpocetine and carbamazepine involves a decrease in Na+ channels permeability. We here propose that this mechanism of action also involves a decrease in cerebral inflammation.

    5. Neuronal Plasticity & Behavior

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      Astrocyte-dependent protective effect of quetiapine on GABAergic neuron is associated with the prevention of anxiety-like behaviors in aging mice after long-term treatment (pages 780–789)

      Junhui Wang, Shenghua Zhu, Hongxing Wang, Jue He, Yanbo Zhang, Abulimiti Adilijiang, Handi Zhang, Kelly Hartle, Huining Guo, Jiming Kong, Qingjun Huang and Xin-Min Li

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12771

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      The neuroprotective properties of quetiapine (QTP) have not been fully understood. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which QTP increases the synthesis of ATP in astrocytes and protects GABAergic neurons from aging-induced death in a primary cell culture model. In 12-month-old mice, QTP significantly improves cell number of GABAegic neurons and ameliorates anxiety-like behaviors. Our study indicates that astrocytes may be the conduit through which QTP exerts its neuroprotective effects on GABAergic neurons.

      Cover Image for this issue for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.12583.

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      Mu-opioid receptor splice variants: sex-dependent regulation by chronic morphine (pages 790–796)

      Vittorio Verzillo, Priyanka A. Madia, Nai-Jiang Liu, Sumita Chakrabarti and Alan R. Gintzler

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12768

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      Chronic systemic morphine increases levels of mRNA encoding two splice variants of mu-opioid receptor (MOR), MOR-1B2 and MOR-1C1, variants differing from rMOR-1 in their C-terminal (and phosphorylation sites therein) and thus possibly signaling sequelae. This adaptation is sex-specific. It occurs in the spinal cord of males, but not females, indicating the importance of sex-specific mechanisms for and treatments of tolerance and addiction.

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      Hippocampal proteoglycans brevican and versican are linked to spatial memory of Sprague–Dawley rats in the morris water maze (pages 797–804)

      Sivaprakasam R. Saroja, Ajinkya Sase, Susanne G. Kircher, Jia Wan, Johannes Berger, Harald Höger, Arnold Pollak and Gert Lubec

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12783

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      Proteoglycans (PGs) are major constituents of the extracellular matrix of the brain and were proposed to contribute to synaptic plasticity. This report addressed PGs in rat hippocampus and suggests that PGs brevican and versican are linked to spatial memory, and form a complex with the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA receptor, a key signaling molecule in memory mechanisms.

  6. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
    1. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

      Molecular Basis of Disease
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      Enteric GFAP expression and phosphorylation in Parkinson's disease (pages 805–815)

      Thomas Clairembault, Willem Kamphuis, Laurène Leclair-Visonneau, Malvyne Rolli-Derkinderen, Emmanuel Coron, Michel Neunlist, Elly M. Hol and Pascal Derkinderen

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12742

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We showed that GFAP is over-expressed and hypophosphorylated in the enteric glial cells (EGCs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients as compared to healthy subjects and patients with atypical parkinsonism (MSA, multiple system atrophy and PSP, progressive supranuclear palsy). Our findings provide evidence that enteric glial reaction occurs in PD but not in PSP and MSA and further reinforce the role of the enteric nervous system in the pathophysiology of PD.

      Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 729.

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
    1. Molecular Basis of Disease

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      Knockdown of phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator induces apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway and the attenuation by simultaneous tau hyperphosphorylation (pages 816–825)

      Dan-Ju Luo, Qiong Feng, Zhi-Hao Wang, Dong-Sheng Sun, Qun Wang, Jian-Zhi Wang and Gong-Ping Liu

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12761

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      Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) is decreased in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and AD transgenic mouse models. Here, we investigated whether down-regulation of PTPA affects cell viability. We found that PTPA located in the integral membrane of mitochondria, and knockdown of PTPA induced cell apoptosis in HEK293 and N2a cell lines by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, which leads to translocation of Bax and a simultaneous release of Cyt C. In the cells with tau over-expression, PTPA knockdown inactivated PP2A to phosphorylate tau to avoid cell apoptosis which induced by PTPA knockdown.

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      Endogenous neurotoxic dopamine derivative covalently binds to Parkinson's disease-associated ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 and alters its structure and function (pages 826–838)

      Viorica Raluca Contu, Yaichiro Kotake, Takashi Toyama, Katsuhiro Okuda, Masatsugu Miyara, Shuichiro Sakamoto, Shigeyoshi Samizo, Seigo Sanoh, Yoshito Kumagai and Shigeru Ohta

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12762

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      We investigated the interaction between ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and the brain endogenous parkinsonism inducer 1-(3′,4′-dihydroxybenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (3′,4′DHBnTIQ). Our results indicate that 3′,4′DHBnTIQ binds to UCH-L1 specifically at cysteine 152 and induces its aggregation. 3′,4′DHBnTIQ also inhibits the hydrolase activity of UCH-L1. Catechol-modified as well as insoluble UCH-L1 were detected in the midbrains of MPTP-treated Parkinson's disease (PD) model mice. Conjugation of UCH-L1 by neurotoxic endogenous compounds like 3′,4′DHBnTIQ might play a key role in onset and progression of PD.

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      Use of cysteine-reactive cross-linkers to probe conformational flexibility of human DJ-1 demonstrates that Glu18 mutations are dimers (pages 839–853)

      Janani Prahlad, David N. Hauser, Nicole M. Milkovic, Mark R. Cookson and Mark A. Wilson

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/jnc.12763

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      DJ-1 is a homodimeric protein that protects cells against oxidative stress. Designed mutations that influence the regulatory oxidation of a key cysteine residue have recently been proposed to disrupt DJ-1 dimerization. We use cysteine cross-linking and various biophysical techniques to show that these DJ-1 mutants form dimers with increased conformational flexibility.

  8. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Cover
    3. Issue Information
    4. IN THIS ISSUE
    5. EDITORIAL HIGHLIGHT
    6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    7. HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE
    8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF REVIEWERS
    1. You have free access to this content

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