Predicting Quality of Work Life on Nurses’ Intention to Leave

Authors

  • Ya-Wen Lee RN,

    1. Lambda Beta-at-Large, Doctoral candidate, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University & Supervisor of Nursing Department, Changhua Christian Hospital, Taiwan
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  • Yu-Tzu Dai PhD, RN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Lambda Beta-at-Large, Professor, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, & Supervisor of Nursing Department, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
    • Lambda Beta-at-Large, Doctoral candidate, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University & Supervisor of Nursing Department, Changhua Christian Hospital, Taiwan
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  • Chang-Gi Park PhD,

    1. Senior Research Specialist, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Linda L. McCreary PhD, RN

    1. Alpha-Lambda, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Health Systems Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
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Dr. Yu-Tzu Dai, No 1, Sec 1, Jen-Ai Rd Taipei, 10051, Taiwan.

E-mail: yutzu@ntu.edu.tw

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between quality of work life (QWL) and nurses’ intention to leave their organization (ITLorg).

Design

A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was conducted using purposive sampling of 1,283 nurses at seven hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected from March to June 2012.

Methods

Three questionnaires, including the Chinese version of the Quality of Nursing Work Life scale (C-QNWL), a questionnaire of intention to leave the organization, and a demographic questionnaire, with two informed consent forms were delivered to the nurses at their workplaces. Descriptive data, Pearson's correlations, and the ordinal regression model were analyzed.

Findings

Over half (52.5%) of nurses had ITLorg. Seven QWL dimensions were significantly negatively correlated with ITLorg (r = −0.17 to −0.37, p < .01). Significant predictors (p < .05) of ITLorg (the pseudo R2 = 0.282) were being single, having a diploma or lower educational level, working in a nonteaching hospital. Four of the QWL dimensions—supportive milieu with job security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work or home life balance, and nursing staffing and patient care—were also predictors of ITLorg. Three QWL dimensions were not predictors of ITLorg.

Conclusions

This study showed that individual-related variables (being single, having a diploma or lower educational level), a work-related variable (working at a nonteaching hospital), and the four QWL dimensions play a significant role in nurses’ ITLorg. After the QWL dimensions were added to the regression, the variance explained by the model more than doubled.

Clinical Relevance

To reduce nurses’ ITLorg, nursing administrators may offer more focused interventions to improve the supportive milieu with job security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work or home life balance, and nursing staffing and patient care.

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