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Satisfaction With a Family-Focused Intervention for Mild Cognitive Impairment Dyads

Authors

  • Yvonne Yueh-Feng Lu RN, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Associate Professor, Department Science of Nursing Care, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN, USA
    • Correspondence

      Dr. Yvonne Lu, Department Science of Nursing Care, Indiana University School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU W407, Indianapolis, IN 46202. E-mail: yuelu@iu.edu.

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  • Jennifer Ellis PT, DPT, MS, GCS,

    1. Indiana University School of Health and Rehabilitation, Indianapolis, IN, USA
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  • Ziyi Yang MS,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA
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  • Michael T. Weaver PhD, FAAN,

    1. Professor & Associate Dean for Research & Scholarship, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
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  • Tamilyn Bakas RN, PhD, FAAN,

    1. Professor Emeritus, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN, and Professor and Jane E. Procter Endowed Chair, College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA
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  • Mary Guerriero Austrom PhD,

    1. Wesley P Martin Professor of Alzheimer's Disease Education, Department of Psychiatry, Associate Dean for Diversity Affairs, Indiana University School of Medicine, and Director, Outreach, Recruitment and Education Core, Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center (IADC), Indianapolis, IN, USA
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  • Joan E. Haase RN, PhD, FAAN

    1. Holmquist Professor of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Department Science of Nursing Care, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN, USA
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Abstract

Purpose

This article describes satisfaction that persons with mild cognitive impairment (PwMCI) and their caregivers had with the Daily Enhancement of Meaningful Activity (DEMA) intervention.

Methods

This randomized controlled pilot study compared satisfaction (usefulness, ease of use, and acceptability) with DEMA (n = 17 dyads) to an information support (IS) control group (n = 19 dyads). Six biweekly sessions (two in person and four by telephone) were delivered by trained nurses. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, independent-sample t tests, and content analysis.

Findings

PwMCI receiving DEMA rated their satisfaction significantly higher (p = .033) than did the control group; there was no difference in satisfaction between caregivers across groups. Qualitative interview data supported the usefulness, ease of use, and acceptability of DEMA for both PwMCI and caregivers.

Conclusions

Results documented PwMCI's satisfaction with DEMA as implemented by nurses to support PwMCI–caregiver dyads’ engagement in meaningful activity. DEMA may need revision to increase satisfaction for caregivers.

Clinical Relevance

The DEMA intervention was evaluated as useful, easy to use, and acceptable to PwMCI and their caregivers based on positive mean ratings. The study findings provide preliminary support of DEMA as a means to improve quality of life by helping to support patient and caregiver engagement in meaningful activities and problem solving.

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