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Keywords:

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease;
  • family-centred care;
  • integrated systematic review;
  • methodology;
  • nurse–family relationship;
  • patient-centred care;
  • self-care;
  • self-management;
  • self-management educational programme;
  • self-management programme

Aims and objectives

To synthesise findings from previously published studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Background

Self-management is a widely valued concept to address contemporary issues of chronic health problems. Yet, findings of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are indecisive.

Design

Literature review of (1) previously published systematic reviews and (2) an integrative literature review.

Method

Synthesis of findings from previously published systematic reviews (n = 4) of the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and an integrated review that was performed on papers published between January 2007–June 2012 (n = 9).

Results

Findings demonstrate that there are few studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes on people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease despite more than a decade of research activities. Outcomes of the studies reveal some increase in health-related quality of life and reduction in use of healthcare resources. The methodological approaches vary, and the sample size is primarily small. Families are not acknowledged. Features of patient-centredness exist in self-management programmes, particularly in the more recent articles.

Conclusions

The effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains indecisive.

Relevance to clinical practice

A reconceptualisation of self-management programmes is called for with attention to a family-centred, holistic and relational care focusing on living with and minimising the handicapping consequences of the health problems in their entirety.