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Including nurses in care models for older people with mild to moderate depression: an integrative review

Authors

  • Jutta Dreizler MScN, RN,

    Research Associate, Institute of Nursing, Corresponding author
    1. School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland
    • Correspondence: Jutta Dreizler, Research Associate, Institute of Nursing, School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Technikumstr. 71, 8401 Winterthur, Switzerland. Telephone: +41 058 934 64 03.

      E-mail: Jutta.dreizler@zhaw.ch

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  • Andrea Koppitz Dr. rer. medic., RN,

    Deputy Program Director, Lecturer and Research Project Manager
    1. School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland
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  • Sebastian Probst DClinPrac, RN,

    Lecturer and Research Project Manager
    1. School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland
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  • Romy Mahrer-Imhof PhD, RN

    Program Director
    1. School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Winterthur, Switzerland
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Abstract

Aims and objectives

The aim of this integrative literature review was twofold: (1) to investigate different collaborative programmes for older people with depression living at home with diverse access to care and (2) to describe conceptualisation of the nurses' role and interventions within these care models.

Background

One in four older people who visits a General Practitioner suffers from depression. Depression is a concern for 15% of all older home-care service clients. Detecting and managing depression in older people is highlighted as a key role of nurses. A literature review has been conducted to investigate collaborative models of care, aimed at ensuring low-threshold access to care and exploring the scope of nurse practice within these models.

Methods

Literature review comprising 14 studies and reviews.

Results

Three different collaborative care programmes (Collaborative Care Model, Community Mental Health Team and Psychogeriatric Assessment and Treatment in City Housing programme) were identified. In all programmes, the essential aspects were complex and multifaceted interventions, provided by a variety of healthcare professionals, but the access to care differed. All studies described the role of nurses differently and with wide variations.

Conclusions

Despite a broad scope of practice, nurses play a pivotal role within the different models of care. Nurses have to have the educational background and expertise in mental health issues to recognise depression and eventually be able to provide more comprehensive interventions to alleviate depression in older people.

Relevance to practice

Collaboration is needed to meet the needs of older people with depression. New forms of work divisions are pivotal to achieve this objective.

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