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The efficacy of diabetic foot care education

Authors

  • Jana Nemcová PhD, MSN, RN,

    Lecturer, Corresponding author
    1. Nursing Department, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia
    • Correspondence: Jana Nemcova, Lecturer, Nursing Department, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 5, Martin 036 01, Slovakia. Telephone: +421 43 2633436.

      E-mail: nemcova@jfmed.uniba.sk

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  • Edita Hlinková PhD, MSN, RN

    Lecturer
    1. Nursing Department, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia
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Abstract

Aims and objectives

To survey the efficacy of education about factors that influence the learning process and behaviour of diabetics following a nursing interventional project in diabetic foot care education.

Background

Educating diabetics can change their behaviour, which may contribute to the prevention of diabetic foot ulcer and amputation. However, there is little information on the factors that contribute to effectiveness of foot care education.

Design

Survey.

Methods

The data before education were collected by using structured assessment based on a practical reasoning scheme. The interventional diabetic foot care education project immediately followed. We used verbal and written patient education material. After education (six months), we used a questionnaire by postadministration. The data were analysed using content analysis, descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.

Results

We discovered a rise of knowledge, willingness and motivation to learn and to change the behaviour of diabetics after education. The clinical parameters (weight, Body Mass Index, blood pressure) demonstrated a statistically significant positive change six months after education.

Conclusion

The findings after education show a rise in knowledge, willingness and motivation, which are important factors that contribute to changing behaviour of diabetics in diabetic foot care. After education, we identified better results in terms of weight and blood pressure, both of which play a role in the prevention of diabetic ulcer.

Relevance to clinical practice

The education valuable tool ensures knowledge, motivation and willingness to change behaviour in order to prevent diabetic foot complications of diabetics. By using structured assessment, nurses are able to modify their educational interventions.

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