Transitional experiences in patients following intracranial aneurysm rupture

Authors

  • Ann-Christin von Vogelsang PhD, RN, CNOR,

    Senior Lecturer, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden
    • Correspondence: Ann-Christin von Vogelsang, Senior Lecturer, The Red Cross University College, P.O. 55676, SE-102 15 Stockholm, Sweden. Telephone: +46 8 587 516 17.

      E-mail: ann-christin.von-vogelsang@ki.se

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yvonne Wengström PhD, RN, OCN,

    Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor
    1. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mikael Svensson MD, PhD,

    Professor of Neurosurgery
    1. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christina Forsberg PhD, RN

    Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor
    1. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To describe changes and transitions in everyday life in the first two years following an intracranial aneurysm rupture.

Background

An intracranial aneurysm rupture causes a haemorrhagic stroke, and the physical and mental consequences of this condition are numerous and complex. In Sweden, some, but not all, patients receive rehabilitation for this condition. Patients with this type of stroke are not included in the national stroke registry; thus, information on the recovery period for these particular patients is lacking.

Design

A longitudinal mixed methods study design was used.

Methods

The sample was consecutive and consisted of 88 patients (84·6% of 104 eligible), acutely admitted to a neurosurgical clinic in Stockholm for intracranial aneurysm rupture. Data were collected through a postal study-specific questionnaire at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years postaneurysm rupture. Intramethod mixing was used in the data collection, and quantitative and qualitative data were analysed parallel with statistical and qualitative content analysis.

Results

A majority of participants perceived changes in their everyday lives during the first two years following aneurysm rupture, and the changes were ongoing with little differences reported between 6 months and 2 years after the onset. Internal changes, or transitions, were revealed within changes in personality, changed social roles and relationships and changed abilities and behaviour.

Conclusions

Recovering from an intracranial aneurysm rupture involves a period of intense changes and transitions, a vulnerable period for many people that may be made easier to manage by the intervention of nurses.

Relevance to clinical practice

Patients experiencing transitions in the recovery period after intracranial aneurysm rupture may benefit from nursing interventions that support them through the transitional process. Nurse-led follow-up care by a specialist nurse from the neurosurgical clinic may be a possible way to provide support.

Ancillary