Community-based interventions to promote management for older people: an integrative review

Authors

  • Sakuntala Anuruang RN,

    PhD Candidate, Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
    • Correspondence: Sakuntala Anuruang, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 Australia. Telephone: +61 (0) 423062498.

      E-mail: Sakuntala.Anuruang@student.uts.edu.au

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  • Louise D Hickman PhD, RN,

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Debra Jackson PhD, RN,

    Associate Head, Professor
    1. Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
    2. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Nursing, Midwifery & Health Development, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Tessa Dharmendra Master of Human Rights, BA (Sociology),

    Project Manager
    1. Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
    2. Centre for Cardiovascular & Chronic Care, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Jane Van Balen MMus.St. (Pedagogy), BA (Lib.Sc),

    Information Services Librarian
    1. University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Patricia M Davidson PhD, RN

    Director, Professor
    1. Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
    2. Centre for Cardiovascular & Chronic Care, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
    3. Cardiovascular Nursing Research, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia
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Abstract

Aims and objectives

To review community programmes promoting self-care or self-management for older people with chronic disease in Thailand.

Background

Identifying successful elements of culturally appropriate and effective community-based interventions to promote self-care with chronic illness is increasingly important.

Design

Integrative review.

Data sources

CINAHL, Medline, Health Source Nursing Academic databases.

Methods

Integrative review of peer-reviewed articles written between 1946–2012. Articles were included if they described self-care, self-management, chronic disease and community care interventions targeting older people in Thailand.

Results

Of the 58 articles retrieved, only 13 articles met the eligibility criteria. Elements of effective interventions included: (1) providing culturally sensitive information, (2) including approaches of shared decision-making and mutual goal setting and (3) flexibility within the intervention to adapt to participant needs.

Conclusions

Shared decision-making and mutual goal setting between interventionists and patients improved health behaviours and outcomes. Moreover, the flexibility to adopt the intervention to local characteristics demonstrated positive results.

Relevance to clinical practice

Promoting effective self-care and self-management behaviours is critical to improving outcomes for chronic conditions. The tailoring and targeting of interventions appropriate to individuals and communities are likely to be most effective in leveraging behaviour change. This review has identified that mutual goal setting improved health behaviours. The flexibility to adopt self-care interventions to community-based settings showed improved patient outcomes.

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