Nurses' delivery of the Tobacco Tactics intervention at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Authors

  • Amanda M Fore MS, RN,

    Nurse Coordinator/Program Analyst
    1. National Center for Patient Safety, MI, USA
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  • Carrie A Karvonen-Gutierrez MPH,

    Research Health Science Specialist
    1. Department of Health Services Research and Development, Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research, MI, USA
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  • AkkeNeel Talsma PhD, RN, FAAN,

    Research Investigator
    1. School of Medicine, University of Michigan, MI, USA
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  • Sonia A Duffy PhD, RN, FAAN

    Research Scientist and Professor, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Services Research and Development, Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research, MI, USA
    2. Departments of Otolaryngology and Psychiatry, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    • Correspondence: Sonia A Duffy, Research Scientist and Professor, Department of Health Services Research and Development, Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor, MI, USA and Departments of Otolaryngology and Psychiatry, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, 2215 Fuller Rd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA. Telephone: +1 734 395 0613.

      E-mail: bump@umich.edu

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Abstract

Aims and objectives

To determine (1) factors associated with nurses' perceived confidence in and importance of delivering cessation interventions to patients after receiving the Tobacco Tactics educational module, and (2) whether self-reported delivery of smoking cessation services increased after the Tobacco Tactics educational programme was implemented.

Background

Intensive nurse-based inpatient smoking cessation interventions are effective; however, due to a lack of nurse confidence, training and time, nurse-administered cessation interventions are seldom implemented.

Design

Two cross-sectional surveys among staff trained in the Tobacco Tactics programme, conducted at two months and 15 months post-training.

Methods

Surveys were conducted to determine whether self-reported delivery of smoking cessation services by nursing staff increased after delivery of the Tobacco Tactics training at a Midwestern Veterans Affairs Medical Center. All staff members who attended the training were eligible to complete the surveys at two and 15 months post-training.

Results

Having a good understanding of the elements of smoking cessation interventions and satisfaction with training were associated with perceived confidence and importance of delivering smoking cessation interventions. Additionally, 86% of participants reported delivering cessation interventions 15 months post-training compared with 57% prior to training (p < 0·0001).

Conclusions

Training nurses how to deliver tobacco cessation interventions increases delivery of cessation services.

Relevance to clinical practice

Nurse-delivered cessation interventions have the potential to increase quit rates and decrease morbidity and mortality among patient populations.

Ancillary