District nurses’ and registered nurses’ training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings

Authors

  • Ann-Sofi Östlund RN,

    PhD student, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    2. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
    • Correspondence: Ann-Sofi Östlund, PhD Student, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 564, Uppsala 751 22, Sweden. Telephone: +46 26 645010.

      E-mail: ann-sofi.ostlund@hig.se

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Barbro Wadensten PhD, RN,

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elisabeth Häggström PhD, RNT,

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    2. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marja-Leena Kristofferzon PhD, RNT

    Senior Lecturer in Nursing
    1. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    2. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use.

Background

Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care.

Design

A cross-sectional survey study.

Methods

A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011–January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested.

Results

According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of ‘other’ obstacles.

Conclusions

Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing.

Relevance to clinical practice

Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing.

Ancillary