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The effect of facilitated tucking on procedural pain control among premature babies

Authors

  • Olive Lopez MScNsg, RN,

    Postgraduate student
    1. Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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  • Pathmawathi Subramanian DHSci, MEd, BSciNsg,

    Senior Lecturer, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    • Correspondence: Pathmawathi Subramanian, Senior Lecturer, Department of Nursing Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia. Telephone: +603 7949 3646.

      E-mails: pathmawathi@um.edu.my; pathma@ummc.edu.my

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  • Norsiah Rahmat DipAdvNursing, MMEdSc, BNSc,

    Lecturer
    1. Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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  • Lim Chin Theam MRCP, MBBS,

    Professor
    1. Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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  • Karuthan Chinna PhD, MSc, BSc Ed,

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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  • Roshaslina Rosli BBiomedSc, DMLT

    Postgraduate student
    1. Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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Abstract

Aims and Objectives

To determine the effectiveness of facilitated tucking in reducing pain when venepuncture is being performed on preterm infants.

Background

Preterm neonates are exposed to a myriad of invasive, often painful, procedures throughout their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. A growing volume of evidence shows that pain in preterm infants has both short- and long-term deleterious effects. It is within the power and ethical responsibility of neonatal nurses to help premature babies cope with procedural pain.

Design

A quasi-experimental study with two groups: control and treatment group.

Methods

A study was conducted on a cohort of preterm infants (n = 42), divided into control (n = 21) and treatment (n = 21) groups, to determine the effect of facilitated tucking on pain relief during venepuncture on preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. The severity of pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile score. The primary outcome measure was reduction in the Premature Infant Pain Profile scores.

Results

The Premature Infant Pain Profile score for the treatment group was significantly lower (M = 6·62, SD 2·598) than for the control group (6·62 ± 2·60 vs. 8·52 ± 2·99, respectively, t = −2·202, p < 0·05).

Conclusions

Facilitated tucking reduced the Premature Infant Pain Profile scores in preterm infants.

Relevance to clinical practice

The findings of this study suggest that facilitated tucking is able to alleviate pain; therefore, nurses must be able to carry out facilitated tucking when necessary.

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