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Understanding and achieving person-centred care: the nurse perspective

Authors

  • Helen Ross BA, MSc, PgDip, RGN,

    Senior Lecturer in Nursing, Professional Development Co-ordinator, Professional Doctorate Student (Health and Social Care), Corresponding author
    1. Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield, UK
    2. Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK
    • Correspondence: Helen Ross, Senior Lecturer in Nursing, Professional Development Co-ordinator, Professional Doctorate Student (Health and Social Care), Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, Mundella House, 34 Collegiate Crescent, Sheffield S102BP, UK. Telephone: +44 114 225 5692.

      E-mail: h.ross@shu.ac.uk

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  • Angela Mary Tod BA, MSc, MMedSci, PhD, RGN,

    Professor of Health and Health Services Research
    1. Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK
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  • Amanda Clarke BA, MA, PgDip, PhD, RGN

    Professor of Nursing and Head of Department
    1. Healthcare, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coach Lane Campus (West), Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
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Abstract

Aims and objectives

To present findings from the first stage of an exploratory study investigating nurses' understanding and facilitation of person-centred care within an acute medical ward.

Background

The term ‘person-centred care’ is used frequently in healthcare policy and practice. However, the ways in which the concept is translated into everyday nursing care continue to present a challenge. Person-centred care has been explored extensively within the care of older people, people with dementia and people with a learning disability. Little empirical research has been conducted in acute ward settings. This study starts to address that gap.

Design

The study used an action research approach.

Methods

Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 14 nurses. Framework analysis was used to analyse the data.

Results

Nurses had a clear understanding of person-centred care in the context of their work. They acknowledged the importance of relationships, personal qualities of staff and respecting the principles of person-centred care as they strived to provide safe, high-quality person-centred care.

Conclusion

The examples of care given by the nurses in this study resonate with the ‘six Cs’ emphasised by the Chief Nursing Officer for England in 2012, acknowledge the motivation of nurses to provide person-centred care and will contribute to the ongoing debate about nursing practice.

Relevance to clinical practice

In the light of recent criticisms of nursing and the implied erosion of public confidence in the provision of high-quality health care, it is important to recognise good practice and use the findings as a foundation for further and sustained development in providing person-centred care.

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