Value and Momentum Everywhere

Authors

  • CLIFFORD S. ASNESS,

  • TOBIAS J. MOSKOWITZ,

  • LASSE HEJE PEDERSEN

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    • Asness is at AQR Capital Management; Moskowitz is at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and NBER and is a consultant to AQR Capital; and Pedersen is at the New York University Stern School of Business, Copenhagen Business School, AQR, CEPR, FRIC, and NBER. We thank Aaron Brown, John Cochrane, Kent Daniel, Gene Fama, Kenneth French, Cam Harvey (the Editor), Ronen Israel, Robert Krail, John Liew, Harry Mamaysky, Michael Mendelson, Stefan Nagel, Lars Nielsen, Otto Van Hemert, Jeff Wurgler, and an anonymous referee for helpful comments, as well as seminar participants at the University of Chicago, Princeton University, Duke University, the Danish Society of Financial Analysts with Henrik Amilon and Asbjørn Trolle as discussants, and the NBER Summer Institute Asset Pricing Meetings with Kent Daniel as a discussant. We also thank Gunner Arnson, Radhika Gupta, Kelvin Hu, Sarah Jiang, Adam Klein, Ari Levine, Len Lorilla, Wes McKinney, and Karthik Sridharan for research assistance. AQR Capital invests in, among other things, value and momentum strategies. The views expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of any affiliated institution.


ABSTRACT

We find consistent value and momentum return premia across eight diverse markets and asset classes, and a strong common factor structure among their returns. Value and momentum returns correlate more strongly across asset classes than passive exposures to the asset classes, but value and momentum are negatively correlated with each other, both within and across asset classes. Our results indicate the presence of common global risks that we characterize with a three-factor model. Global funding liquidity risk is a partial source of these patterns, which are identifiable only when examining value and momentum jointly across markets. Our findings present a challenge to existing behavioral, institutional, and rational asset pricing theories that largely focus on U.S. equities.

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