Get access

Breeding ecology of Red-faced Cormorants in the Pribilof Islands, Alaska

Authors

  • Sadie K. Wright,

    Corresponding author
    1. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, 95 Sterling Highway, Suite 1, Homer, Alaska 99603, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. Vernon Byrd,

    1. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, 95 Sterling Highway, Suite 1, Homer, Alaska 99603, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Current address: University of the Nations, 75–5851 Kuikini Hwy #129, Kailua-Kona, HI 96740, USA

  • Heather M. Renner,

    1. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, 95 Sterling Highway, Suite 1, Homer, Alaska 99603, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Arthur L. Sowls

    1. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, 95 Sterling Highway, Suite 1, Homer, Alaska 99603, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Current address: P. O. Box 1693, Homer, AK 99603, USA


National Marine Fisheries Service, Protected Resources Division. 709 West 9th Street, Juneau, AK 99802, USA. Email: sadie.wright@noaa.gov

Abstract

ABSTRACT Red-faced Cormorants (Phalacrocorax urile) are North Pacific endemics recognized as a vulnerable species, but little is known about their breeding ecology. We studied Red-faced Cormorants on St. Paul Island, Alaska, from 1975 to 2009, with more detailed data collected in 2004 and 2005. Mean clutch sizes in 2004 (3.2 ± 0.8 [SD] eggs) and 2005 (3.1 ± 0.8 eggs) were similar to the long-term average (2.9 ± 0.3 eggs from 1976 to 2009). The mean laying interval in 2004 and 2005 was 2.15 ± 0.80 d (N= 407), and the mean egg period (number of days between laying of an egg and hatching) was 31.1 ± 1.4 d (N= 158). Approximately 64 ± 17% of eggs hatched during the period from 1975 to 2009. The mean number of chicks per nest in 2004 and 2005 was 2.8 ± 0.8 (N= 232), and the mean number of fledglings per initiated nest in all years was 1.22 ± 0.52. Chicks fledged 46 to 66 d posthatching. In 2004 and 2005, the primary causes of egg loss were predation by Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) and destruction of eggs and abandonment of nests due to storms. Starvation was the primary cause of nestling mortality in both years. Because chicks are dependent on parents to provide food for over 45 d, consistent near-shore foraging opportunities must be available. From 1975 to 2009, Red-faced Cormorants experienced only 1 yr of complete reproductive failure (1984). The consistent reproductive success of Red-faced Cormorants suggests that conditions may be relatively stable for this species on St. Paul Island, or that the variability in their breeding ecology (e.g., phenology, clutch sizes, and incubation strategies) provides the flexibility needed to successfully fledge some chicks nearly every year.

RESUMEN

Phalacrocorax urile es una especies endémica del Pacifico norte y reconocida como vulnerable, pero poco se conoce sobre su ecología reproductiva. Estudiamos P. urile en la isla St. Paul, Alaska, desde 1975 hasta 2009, con datos colectados mas detalladamente en 2004 y 2005. El tamaño promedio de la nidada en el 2004 (3.2 ± 0.8 [SD] huevos) y en el 2005 (3.1 ± 0.8 huevos) fueron similares a el promedio a lo largo del estudio (2.9 ± 0.3 huevos desde 1976–2009). El intervalo promedio de la puesta en 2004 y 2005 fue 2.15 ± 0.80 d (N= 407), y el promedio del periodo de huevos (numero de días entre la puesta del primer huevo y la eclosión) fue 31.1 ± 1.4 d (N= 158). Aproximadamente 64 ± 17% de los huevo eclosionaron exitosamente en el periodo comprendido entre 1975 y 2009. El numero promedio de polluelos por nido en 2004 y 2005 fue de 2.8 ± 0.8 (N= 232), y el numero promedio de volantones que salieron por nido activo en todos los años fue de 1.22 ± 0.52. Los polluelos salieron del nido entre 46 y 66 días después de haber eclosionado. En 2004 y 2005, la principal causa de perdida de huevos fue la depredación por parte del zorro ártico (Vulpes lagopus), y destrucción de huevos y abandono de nidos debido a tormentas. Desnutrición fue la primera causa de mortalidad de polluelos en ambos años. Debido a que los polluelos dependen de los padres para alimentarse por mas de 45 días, la disponibilidad de áreas para buscar alimento cerca a la orilla es importante. Desde 1975 hasta 2009, P. urile experimento un solo año de completo fracaso reproductivo (1984). El constante éxito reproductivo de P. urile sugiere que las condiciones para esta especie son relativamente estables en la isla St. Paul o que la variabilidad en su ecología reproductiva (e.g., fenología, tamaño de la nidada y estrategias de incubación) provee la flexibilidad necesaria para que salgan exitosamente algunos polluelos del nido cada año.

Ancillary