Single Motherhood, Living Arrangements, and Time With Children in Japan

Authors

  • James M. Raymo,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Wisconsin—Madison
    • Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1180 Observatory Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (jraymo@ssc.wisc.edu).

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hyunjoon Park,

    1. University of Pennsylvania
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, 3718 Locust Walk, 219 McNeil Building, Suite 113, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6299.
  • Miho Iwasawa,

    1. National Institute of Population and Social Security Research, Japan
    Search for more papers by this author
    • National Institute of Population and Social Security Research, Hibiya Kokusai Building, 6th Floor, 2-2-3 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011, Japan.
  • Yanfei Zhou

    1. Japan Institute for Labour Policy and Training
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Japan Institute for Labour Policy and Training, 4-8-23, Kamishakujii, Nerima-ku, Tokyo 177-8502, Japan.

Abstract

The authors examined relationships between single parenthood and mothers' time with children in Japan. Using data from the 2011 National Survey of Households with Children (N = 1,926), they first demonstrate that time spent with children and the frequency of shared dinners are significantly lower for single mothers than for their married counterparts. For single mothers living alone, less time with children reflects long work hours and work-related stress. Single mothers coresiding with parents spend less time with children and eat dinner together less frequently than either married mothers or their unmarried counterparts not living with parents, net of (grand)parental support, work hours, income, and stress. The findings suggest that rising divorce rates and associated growth in single-mother families may have a detrimental impact on parents' time with children in Japan and that the relatively high prevalence of intergenerational coresidence among single mothers may do little to temper this impact.

Ancillary