Organisational values and organisational commitment: do nurses’ ethno-cultural differences matter?

Authors

  • Tova Hendel RN PhD,

    Senior Teacher and Head
    1. Baccalaureate Program, Nursing Department, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
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  • Ilya Kagan RN PhD

    Senior Coordinator, Corresponding author
    1. Quality and Patient Safety in Nursing, Rabin Medical Center, Clalit Health Services and Lecturer, Nursing Department, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • Correspondence

      Ilya Kagan

      Nursing Department

      Steyer School of Health Professions

      Sackler Faculty of Medicine

      Tel Aviv University

      Tel Aviv

      Israel

      E-mail: kaganily@post.tau.ac.il

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Abstract

Aim

To examine the association between perceived organisational values and organisational commitment among Israeli nurses in relation to their ethno-cultural background.

Background

Differences and the discrepancy between individuals' organisational values and those of their organisational culture are a potential source of adjustment difficulties. Organisational values are considered to be the bond of the individual to their organisation. In multicultural societies, such as Israel, the differences in perception of organisational values and organisational commitment may be reflected within workgroups.

Method

Data were collected using a questionnaire among 106 hospital nurses. About 59.8% of the sample were Israeli-born.

Results

A positive correlation was found between organisational values and organisational commitment. Significant differences were found in organisational values and organisational commitment between Israeli-born-, USSR-born- and Ethiopian-born nurses. The socio-demographic profile modified the effect of organisational values on organisational commitment: when the nurse was male, Muslim, religiously orthodox and without academic education, the effect of organisational values on organisational commitment was higher.

Conclusion

Findings confirm the role of culture and ethnicity in the perception of organisational values and the level of organisational commitment among nurses.

Implications for nursing management

Assessing ethno-cultural differences in organisational values and organisational commitment provides a fuller understanding of nurses' ability to adjust to their work environment and helps nurse managers devise means to increase nurses' commitment.

Ancillary