Safeguarding in medication administration: understanding pre-registration nursing students' survey response to patient safety and peer reporting issues

Authors

  • Sharon Andrew RN, PhD, BAppSc, MSc(Hons),

    Professor of Nursing, Corresponding author
    1. Professor of Nursing, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Rivermead Campus, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, Essex, UK
    • Correspondence

      Sharon Andrew

      Anglia Ruskin University

      Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education

      Rivermead Campus

      Anglia Ruskin University

      Bishops Hall Lane

      Chelmsford

      Essex CM1 1SQ

      UK

      E-mail: sharon.andrew@anglia.ac.uk

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  • Mansour Mansour RN, PhD, MSc, BSc, PGCert

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Professor of Nursing, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Rivermead Campus, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, Essex, UK
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Abstract

Aim

To explore nursing students' experiences of patient safety and peer reporting using hypothetical medication administration scenarios.

Background

Pre-registration nurse training is tasked with the preparation of students able to provide safe, high quality nursing care. How students' contextualise teaching related to patient safety, risk recognition and management in the clinical setting is less clear.

Method

A total of 321 third year students enrolled in the final semester of an adult branch pre-registration nursing programme in 2011 in a UK university were surveyed. Using free texts, the questionnaire contained hypothetical medication administration scenarios where patient safety could potentially be at risk. Students' qualitative responses were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The response rate was 58% (= 186). Four themes were identified from the scenarios: (1) Protecting patient safety (2) Willingness to compromise; (3) Avoiding responsibility; (4) Consequences from my actions.

Conclusion

The findings underscore the importance of contextual teaching about risk management, practical techniques for error management and leadership for optimal patient safety in nursing curricula.

Implications for nursing management

Nurse managers are role models for nursing students in the clinical setting. Nursing management must lead, by example, the patient safety agenda in the clinical setting.

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