Male first-line managers' experiences of the work situation in elderly care: an empowerment perspective

Authors

  • Heidi Hagerman RN,

    PhD Student, Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences University of Gävle, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden
    • Correspondence

      Heidi Hagerman

      University of Gävle

      Kungsbäcksvägen 47

      801 76 Gävle

      Sweden

      E-mail: heidi.hagerman@hig.se

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  • Maria Engström RN, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences University of Gävle, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden
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  • Elisabeth Häggström RN, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences University of Gävle, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden
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  • Barbro Wadensten RN, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
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  • Bernice Skytt RN, PhD

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences University of Gävle, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden
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Abstract

Aim

To describe male first-line managers' experiences of their work situation in elderly care.

Background

First-line managers' work is challenging. However, less attention has been paid to male managers' work situation in health care. Knowledge is needed to empower male managers.

Method

Fourteen male first-line managers were interviewed. The interview text was subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Result

Work situations were described as complex and challenging; challenges were the driving force. They talked about ‘Being on one's own but not feeling left alone’, ‘Having freedom within set boundaries’, ‘Feeling a sense of satisfaction and stimulation’, ‘Feeling a sense of frustration’ and ‘Having a feeling of dejection and resignation’.

Conclusion

Although the male managers report deficiencies in the support structure, they largely experience their work as a positive challenge.

Implications for nursing management

To meet increasing challenges, male first-line managers need better access to supportive structural conditions. Better access to resources is needed in particular, allowing managers to be more visible for staff and to work with development and quality issues instead of administrative tasks. Regarding organisational changes and the scrutiny of management and the media, they lack and thus need support and information from superiors.

Ancillary