Serum albumin levels and 10-year tooth loss in a 70-year-old population

Authors

  • A. Yoshihara,

    Corresponding author
    • Division of Oral Science for Health Promotion, Department of Oral Health and Welfare, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata City, Japan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Iwasaki,

    1. Division of Preventive Dentistry, Department of Oral Health Science, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata City, Japan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • H. Ogawa,

    1. Division of Preventive Dentistry, Department of Oral Health Science, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata City, Japan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • H. Miyazaki

    1. Division of Preventive Dentistry, Department of Oral Health Science, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata City, Japan
    Search for more papers by this author

  • We certify that this research is original, not presently under consideration for publication elsewhere and conducted by the highest principles of human subject and animal welfare.

Correspondence: A. Yoshihara, Division of Oral Science for Health Promotion, Department of Oral Health and Welfare, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, 2-5274, Chuoku Gakkocho-dori, Niigata City, Niigata 951-8514, Japan.

E-mail: akihiro@dent.niigata-u.ac.jp

Summary

Serum albumin levels are a practical marker of general health status in the elderly and have been used to determine the severity of underlying diseases and the risk for death. This longitudinal study evaluated the relationship between serum albumin concentrations and tooth loss over 10 years in elderly subjects, after controlling for confounding factors. A sample of 554 dentate subjects among enrolled subjects (= 600) was involved in this planned longitudinal study with follow-up examinations after 5 and 10 years. At the 5-year follow-up, 373 (67·3%), subjects were available for re-examination. In addition, 331 (59·7%) were available at the 10-year follow-up. Multiple Poisson regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationship between the number of missing teeth over 5 or 10 years and serum albumin levels at baseline after adjusting for 10 variables: gender, serum markers levels at baseline, dental status, smoking habits and educational years and oral health behaviour. The number of missing teeth over 5 or 10 years was significantly negatively associated with serum albumin levels at baseline [incidence rate ratios (IRR) = 0·373, < 0·0001 for 5 years; IRR = 0·570, < 0·0001 for 10 years]. We conclude that elderly subjects with hypoalbuminemia are at high risk for 5- and 10-year tooth loss.

Ancillary