Get access

Long-term subjective tongue function after partial glossectomy

Authors

  • D. Y. Lee,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Y.-J. Ryu,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. H. Hah,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • T.-K. Kwon,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M.-W. Sung,

    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. H. Kim

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    • Correspondence: Kwang Hyun Kim, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744, Korea.

      E-mail:kimkwang@snu.ac.kr

    Search for more papers by this author

  • This article is presented at the 2013 International Academy of Oral Oncology in Greece.

Summary

There have been limited studies of subjective tongue function over long-term follow-up in spite of swallowing and articulation disorders are common complications of glossectomy. To assess long-term subjective swallowing and articulation function after partial glossectomy. A total of 63 patients with the mobile tongue cancer who underwent partial glossectomy without reconstruction were interviewed to score their swallowing and articulation function on a 100-point scale. The relation of this subjective scoring to the perioperative data was subjected to multivariate analysis. The mean patient age was 53·4 (19–81) years, and the mean follow-up duration was 78·9 (14–277) months. Mean swallowing and articulation function score was 87·7 ± 6·1 and 88·6 ± 5·4. Age, follow-up duration, T stage and resection volume were significantly correlated with swallowing function (= 0·026, 0·029, 0·016, 0·002, respectively); follow-up duration was correlated with articulation function (= 0·039). Patients who undergo partial glossectomy without reconstruction generally demonstrate good function on long-term follow-up. Subjective dysfunction was correlated with larger resection volume, older age and shorter follow-up duration.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary