The Association of Screen Time, Television in the Bedroom, and Obesity Among School-Aged Youth: 2007 National Survey of Children's Health

Authors

  • Holly Wethington PhD,

    Corresponding author
    • Behavioral Scientist, (HWethington@cdc.gov), Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE Mail Stop K-26, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717.
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  • Liping Pan MD, MPH,

    1. Epidemiologist, (lmp6@cdc.gov), Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE Mail Stop K-26, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717.
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  • Bettylou Sherry PhD, RD

    1. Lead Epidemiologist, (bls6@cdc.gov), Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE Mail Stop K-26, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717.
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Address correspondence to: Holly Wethington , Behavioral Scientist, (HWethington@cdc.gov), Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE Mail Stop K-26, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND

Among school-aged youth, we sought to identify characteristics associated with (1) exceeding screen time recommendations (ie, television/videos/video games more than 2 hours/weekday), and (2) exceeding screen time recommendations, the presence of a television in the bedroom, and obesity.

METHODS

Using 2007 National Survey of Children's Health data, we used multivariable logistic regression to identify sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with excessive screen time among 6 to 11- and 12 to 17-year-olds on a typical weekday. For 12 to 17-year-olds only, we used logistic regression to examine the odds of obesity using the same variables as above, with the addition of screen time.

RESULTS

Overall, 20.8% of 6 to 11-year-olds and 26.1% of 12 to 17-year-olds had excessive screen time. For both age groups, having a bedroom TV was significantly associated with excessive screen time. For the older age group, the dual scenario of excessive screen time with a bedroom TV had the strongest association with obesity (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.9, 3.2).

CONCLUSIONS

Given the similar risk factors for excess screen time and having a TV in the bedroom, a public health challenge exists to design interventions to reduce screen time among school-aged youth.

Ancillary