Data Sharing to Inform School-Based Asthma Services

Authors

  • Sharon G. Portwood JD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Professor, (sgportwo@uncc.edu), Department of Public Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223.
    • Address correspondence to: Sharon G. Portwood, Professor, (sgportwo@uncc.edu), Department of Public Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elissa B. Nelson MA

    1. Graduate Student, (edbrook@uncc.edu), College of Health & Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28207.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This research was supported by a subcontract funded under Grant #1U87DP001233, awarded by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. The authors would like to acknowledge Nancy Langenfeld, Elizabeth C. Burton, Kelly W. Reeves, and Maria Bonaiuto for their valuable contributions to this work.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND

This article examines results and lessons learned from a collaborative project involving a large urban school district, its county health department, multiple community partners, and the local university to establish an effective system for data sharing to inform monitoring and evaluation of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) Asthma Education Program (AEP).

METHODS

Databases maintained by nurses, program staff, and school personnel were integrated into a single AEP Evaluation Database.

RESULTS

There were a number of positive findings, including evidence that students with an elevated level of need received priority from AEP. A series of dependent group t tests analyzing changes across time in students' grade-point averages and absences, as well as their implications, also demonstrated some improvements. Additional outcome analyses for the 296 students who received case management services demonstrated further program benefits in the areas of attendance, academic performance, behavior, and quality of life.

CONCLUSIONS

Enhancing the ability of school-based programs to merge data across project partners will facilitate efforts not only to evaluate services but also to demonstrate program impact on a wide variety of health and academic outcomes for students.

Ancillary