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Medical management of paediatric burn injuries: Best practice part 2

Authors

  • Rachel D'Cruz,

    1. Burns Unit, The Children's Hospital at Westmead Burns Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    2. Douglas Cohen Department of Paediatric Surgery, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Hugh CO Martin,

    1. Burns Unit, The Children's Hospital at Westmead Burns Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    2. Douglas Cohen Department of Paediatric Surgery, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Andrew JA Holland

    Corresponding author
    1. Burns Unit, The Children's Hospital at Westmead Burns Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    • Douglas Cohen Department of Paediatric Surgery, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Conflict of interest: No conflict of interest to declare.

Correspondence: Professor Andrew JA Holland, Douglas Cohen Department of Paediatric Surgery, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia. Fax: +61 2 9845 3346; email: andrew.holland@health.nsw.gov.au

Abstract 

Burns remain a leading cause of injury in the paediatric population in Australia despite efforts in prevention. Advances in surgical management include novel debridement methods and blood conserving techniques. Patients with severe burns (>20%) remain significantly more complex to manage as a result of extensive alterations in metabolic processes. There appears increasing evidence to support the use of pharmacological modulators of the hyper-metabolic state in these patients. The management of a child with burns involves acute, subacute and long-term planning. This holistic approach seems optimally co-ordinated by a Burns Unit in which each discipline required to provide care to these children in order to achieve optimal outcomes is represented.

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