Evaluation of periodontitis in hospital outpatients with major depressive disorder

Authors

  • A. C. O. Solis,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Stomatology, Discipline of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Ana Cristina Oliveira Solis, PhD, Departamento de Estomatologia-Disciplina de Periodontia, Faculdade de Odontologia, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo-SP, CEP 05508-900, Brasil

      Tel./Fax: +00 55 11 30917833

      e-mail: anacristinasolis@hotmail.com; anacristinasolis@gmail.com

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  • A. H. Marques,

    1. Department of Epidemiology New York, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
    2. Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • C. M. Pannuti,

    1. Department of Stomatology, Discipline of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • R. F. M. Lotufo,

    1. Department of Stomatology, Discipline of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • F. Lotufo-Neto

    1. Department and Institute of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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Abstract

Background and Objective

Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with alterations in the neuroendocrine system and immune function and may be associated with an increased susceptibility to cardiovascular disease, cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disease. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between periodontitis and MDD in a convenience sample of hospital outpatients.

Material and Methods

The sample consisted of 72 physically healthy subjects (36 outpatients with MDD and 36 age-matched controls [± 3 years]). Patients with bipolar disorder, eating disorders and psychotic disorders were excluded. Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded at six sites per tooth. Depression was assessed by means of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV.

Results

Extent of clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth were not different between controls and subjects with depression for the following thresholds: ≥ 3 mm (Mann–Whitney, = 0.927 and 0.756); ≥ 4 mm (Mann–Whitney, = 0.656 and 0.373); ≥ 5 mm (Mann–Whitney, = 0.518 and 0.870);, and ≥ 6 mm (Mann–Whitney, = 0.994 and 0.879). Depression parameters were not associated with clinical attachment level ≥ 5 mm in this sample. Smoking was associated with loss of attachment ≥ 5 mm in the multivariable logistic regression model (odds ratio = 6.99, 95% confidence interval = 2.00–24.43).

Conclusions

In this sample, periodontal clinical parameters were not different between patients with MDD and control subjects. There was no association between depression and periodontitis.

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