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Pulmonic stenosis in dogs: survival and risk factors in a retrospective cohort of patients

Authors


Abstract

Objectives

To assess survival and risk factors in dogs with pulmonic stenosis.

Methods

A retrospective review of medical case records of all cases of pulmonic stenosis >50 mmHg, undergoing pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty or not. Survival curves and multivariate analysis were calculated in the overall population and in subgroups.

Results

One hundred and seventy-two cases were included. Factors negatively affecting survival were clinical signs [hazard ratio (HR) 3 · 44, P < 0 · 001], younger age at diagnosis (HR 3 · 96, P = 0 · 001) and valve morphology type B (HR 3 · 33, P = 0 · 001) in the overall population. In those that had pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty group only clinical signs was significant (HR 3 · 44, P < 0 · 001). In cases that did not undergo pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty group Doppler gradient (HR 1 · 02, P < 0 · 001), clinical signs (HR 5 · 41, P = 0 · 002), valve morphology type B (HR 10 · 20, P = 0 · 001) and younger age at diagnosis (HR 12 · 82, P < 0 · 001) negatively affected survival. Dogs with severe pulmonic stenosis undergoing pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty (HR 0 · 47, P = 0 · 047) and asymptomatic dogs with moderate pulmonic stenosis (HR 0 · 10, P = 0 · 042) had a better outcome. Younger age at diagnosis was correlated with poorer outcome in right-sided congestive heart failure dogs (HR 14 · 02, P = 0 · 01).

Clinical Significance

Clinical signs, valve morphology type B and age at diagnosis are risk factors in pulmonic stenosis patients. Pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty is a reasonable treatment choice in dogs with severe pulmonic stenosis.

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