The Big Five Personality–Entrepreneurship Relationship: Evidence from Slovenia

Authors

  • Bostjan Antoncic,

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    • Address correspondence to: Bostjan Antoncic, Faculty of Economics, University of Ljubljana, Kardeljeva pl. 17, Ljubljana, SI-1000, Slovenia. E-mail: b.antoncic@gmail.com.

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    • Bostjan Antoncic is professor of entrepreneurship at the Faculty of Economics at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His main research interests include corporate entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial networks, personal characteristics of entrepreneurs, and international entrepreneurship.
  • Tina Bratkovic Kregar,

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    • Tina Bratkovic Kregar is assistant professor of entrepreneurship at the Faculty of Management Koper at the University of Primorska, Slovenia. Her main research interests include entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial networks and small business growth.
  • Gangaram Singh,

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    • Gangaram Singh is professor of management as well as the director for the Center for International Business Education and Research at the San Diego State University, USA. His research includes three broad areas: issues of an aging workforce, international employment relations, and innovations of human resource management and collective bargaining.
  • Alex F. DeNoble

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    • Alex F. DeNoble is professor and chair of management at the San Diego State University, USA, and has taught in the EMBA program since 1990. He is actively involved in teaching and research in the areas of strategic management and entrepreneurship.

  • Small business research area: 1. Family and Founders Owned Enterprises

Abstract

Entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship are important for new wealth creation and economic development. Yet insufficient attention has been paid in entrepreneurship research to psychological characteristics such as the big five personality characteristics. In this study, we address this issue by investigating the psychological determinants of real-life entrepreneurial start-up decisions and intentions by contrasting entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs as regards the big five personality factors (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism). Using data collected via face-to-face structured interviews with 546 individuals from Slovenia, we tested hypotheses using multi-nominal logistic regression (supplemented by MANOVA).

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