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Psychometric Properties of the Iranian Version of the Sexual Quality of Life Scale among Women

Authors

  • Amir H. Pakpour PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
    • Qazvin Research Center for Social Determinants of Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
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  • Isa Mohammadi Zeidi PhD,

    1. Department of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
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  • Mohsen Saffari PhD,

    1. Department of Health Education, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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  • Andrea Burri PhD

    1. Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK
    2. Department of Psychology, Psychopathology and Clinical Intervention, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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Corresponding Author: Amir H. Pakpour, PhD, Department of Public Health, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin 34197-59811, Iran. Tel: +98-281-3338127; Fax: +98-281-3345862; E-mail: Pakpour_Amir@yahoo.com

Abstract

Introduction.

Female sexual dysfunction has a known impact on the quality of life.

Aim.

The purpose of this study was the translation and validation of an Iranian version of the Sexual Quality of Life questionnaire-Female (SQOL-F) in Iranian women.

Methods.

A population sample of N = 2,675 women aged 17–67 years from Qazvin City of Iran and two clinical population samples (women with sexual dysfunctions N = 295 and women with type 2 diabetes N = 449) participated in the study. A self-constructed demographic questionnaire, the SQOL-F, the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) were used for data collection.

Main Outcome Measures.

Internal consistency and test–retest reliability were examined. Correlations between the SQOL-F, SF-36, and FSFI were assessed with convergent validity. Furthermore, known-groups comparison analysis was conducted to compare differences in SQOL-F scores between healthy women and those with sexual problems and diabetes. Confirmatory factor analysis assessed the factor structure of the SQOL-F.

Results.

Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.84 to 0.98. Significant correlations between the SQOL-F, SF-36, and FSFI scores were found (ranging from r = 0.4 to r = 0.72). The SQOL-F scores were significantly different between women with and without a clinical condition (P < 0.05). A unifactorial model provided the best fit to the data.

Conclusion.

The questionnaire represents a suitable measure to assess sexuality-related quality of life to sexual function in healthy women, as well as in women suffering from a chronic medical condition. Application of the scale to other clinical samples needs to be further explored.

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