SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Backhaus, J., Junghanns, K., Broocks, A., Riemann, D. and Hohagen, F. Test–retest reliability and validity of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in primary insomnia. J. Psychosom. Res., 2002, 53: 737740.
  • Buysse, D. J., Reynolds, C. F., Monk, T. H., Berman, S. R. and Kupfer, D. J. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index: a new instrument for psychiatric practice and research. Psychiatry Res., 1989, 28: 192213.
  • Clark, D. M. Anxiety disorders: why they persist and how to treat them. Behav. Res. Ther., 1999, 37: S5S27.
  • Clore, G. L., Ortony, A. and Foss, M. A. The psychological foundations of the affective lexicon. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol., 1987, 53: 751766.
  • Dalgleish, T. and Watts, F. N. Biases of attention and memory in disorders of anxiety and depression. Clin. Psychol. Rev., 1990, 20: 499520.
  • De Ruiter, C. and Brosschot, J. F. The emotional Stroop interference effect in anxiety: attentional bias or cognitive avoidance? Behav. Res. Ther., 1994, 32: 315319.
  • Ellis, J., Thomson, A., Gregory, A. M. and Sterr, A. Biased processing of sleep-related stimuli in children of parents with insomnia. Behav. Sleep Med., 2012, DOI: 10.1080/15402002.2011.634050. [Epub ahead of print].
  • Espie, C. A., Broomfield, N. M., Macmahon, K. A. M., Macphee, L. M. and Taylor, L. M. The attention–inattention–effort pathway in the development of psychophysiologic insomnia: a theoretical review. Sleep Med. Rev., 2006, 10: 215245.
  • Harvey, A. G. A cognitive model of insomnia. Behav. Res. Ther., 2002, 40: 869893.
  • Jansson-Frömark, M., Bermås, M. and Kjellén, A. Attentional bias in insomnia: the dot-probe task with pictorial stimuli depicting daytime fatigue/malaise. Cogn. Ther. Res., 2012, DOI: 10.1007/s10608-012-9486-z. [Epub ahead of print].
  • Johnson, E. O., Roth, T. and Breslau, N. The association of insomnia with anxiety disorders and depression: exploration of the direction of risk. J. Psychiatr. Res., 2006, 40: 700708.
  • Jones, B. T., Macphee, L. M., Jones, B. C., Broomfield, N. M. and Espie, C. A. Sleep-related attentional bias in good, moderate, and poor (primary insomnia) sleepers. J. Abnorm. Psychol., 2005, 114: 249258.
  • Lundh, L.-D., Froding, A., Gyllenhammer, L., Broman, J. E. and Hetta, J. Cognitive bias and memory performance in patients with persistent insomnia. Scand. J. Behav. Ther., 1997, 26: 2735.
  • MacMahon, K. A. M., Broomfield, N. M., Marchetti, L. M. and Espie, C. A. Attention bias for sleep-related stimuli in primary insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome using dot-probe task. Sleep, 2006, 29: 14201427.
  • Marchetti, L. M., Biello, S. M., Broomfield, N. M., Macmahon, K. A. M. and Espie, C. A. Who is pre-occupied with sleep? A comparison of attention bias in people with psychophysiological insomnia, delayed sleep phase syndrome and good sleepers using the induced change blindness paradigm. J. Sleep Res., 2006, 15: 212221.
  • Mathews, A. Why worry? The cognitive function of anxiety. Behav. Res. Ther., 1990, 28: 455468.
  • Mathews, A. and MacLeod, C. Selective processing of threat cues in anxiety states. Behav. Res. Ther., 1985, 23: 563569.
  • Mathews, A. and MacLeod, C. Cognitive approaches to emotion and emotional disorders. Annu. Rev. Psychol., 1994, 45: 2550.
  • McNally, R. J., Amir, N., Louro, C. G., Lukach, B. M., Riemann, B. and Calamari, J. G. Cognitive processing of idiographic emotional information in panic disorder. Behav. Res. Ther., 1994, 32: 119122.
  • Mogg, K., Bradley, B. P. and Hallowell, N. Attentional bias to threat: roles of trait anxiety, stressful events, and awareness. Q. J. Exp. Psychol-A., 1994, 47A: 841864.
  • Morin, C. M., Belanger, L., Leblanc, M. et al. The natural history of insomnia: a population-based 3-year longitudinal study. Arch. Intern. Med., 2009, 169: 447453.
  • Ree, M. J., Pollitt, A. and Harvey, A. G. An investigation of interpretive bias in insomnia: an analog study comparing normal and poor sleepers. Sleep, 2006, 29: 13591362.
  • Sagaspe, P., Sanchez-Ortuno, M., Charles, A. et al. Effects of sleep deprivation on color–word, emotional, and specific Stroop interference and on self reported anxiety. Brain Cogn., 2006, 60: 7687.
  • Spiegelhalder, K., Espie, C. A., Nissen, C. and Riemann, D. Sleep-related attentional bias in patients with primary insomnia compared with sleep experts and healthy controls. J. Sleep Res., 2008, 17: 191196.
  • Spiegelhalder, K., Espie, C. A. and Riemann, D. Is sleep-related attentional bias due to sleepiness or sleeplessness? Cogn. Emot., 2009, 23: 541550.
  • Spiegelhalder, K., Kyle, S. D., Feige, B. et al. The impact of sleep-related attentional bias on polysomnographically measured sleep in primary insomnia. Sleep, 2010, 33: 107112.
  • Taylor, L. M., Espie, C. A. and White, C. A. Attentional bias in people with acute versus persistent insomnia secondary to cancer. Behav. Sleep Med., 2003, 1: 200212.
  • Williams, J. M. G., Mathews, A. and MacLeod, C. The emotional Stroop task and psychopathology. Psychol. Bull., 1996, 120: 324.
  • Yiend, J. and Mathews, A. Anxiety and attention to threatening pictures. Q. J. Exp. Psychol-A., 2001, 54: 665681.