Effect of clonazepam and clonidine on primary sleep bruxism: a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial

Authors


  • Clinical trial information: this clinical trial was registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network (ID#000007805).

Summary

The aim of this study was to assess the acute effects of clonazepam and clonidine on rhythmic masticatory muscle activity in young adults with primary sleep bruxism, as well as accompanying effects on sleep architecture and cardiac activity. This study used a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled design. Polysomnography was performed on 19 subjects [nine men and 10 women; mean age (±SE): 25.4 ± 2.7 years] for 5 nights. The first 2 nights were used for the habituation and diagnosis of sleep bruxism. The other 3 nights were randomly assigned for clonazepam (1.0 mg), clonidine (0.15 mg) or placebo (all administered 30 min before bedtime). Sleep, oromotor activity and cardiac activity variables were assessed and compared among the three drug conditions. Clonidine significantly reduced the median percentage of time spent in the rapid eye movement sleep stage compared with placebo and clonazepam. The number of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity episodes was reduced with clonidine by >30% compared with placebo and clonazepam. The reduction of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity index by clonidine was associated with an increase of mean RR intervals (slower heart rate) during quiet sleep periods and during a 70-s period before the onset of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity episodes. However, no changes in cardiac activity variables were observed for clonazepam. In young adults with primary sleep bruxism, clonidine was significantly more effective in suppressing sleep bruxism than clonazepam. The acute effects of clonidine on rhythmic masticatory muscle activity episodes may be mediated by suppression of autonomic nervous system activity and non-rapid eye movement–rapid eye movement sleep processes.

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