Family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and risk of recurrent hospitalization for VTE: a nationwide family study in Sweden

Authors

  • B. Zöller,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Primary Health Care Research, Region Skåne/Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
    • Correspondence: Bengt Zöller, Center for Primary Health Care Research, CRC, Building 28, Floor 11, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Skåne University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden.

      Tel.: +46 70 6691476; fax: +46 40 391370.

      E-mail: bengt.zoller@med.lu.se

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  • H. Ohlsson,

    1. Center for Primary Health Care Research, Region Skåne/Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
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  • J. Sundquist,

    1. Center for Primary Health Care Research, Region Skåne/Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
    2. Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
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  • K. Sundquist

    1. Center for Primary Health Care Research, Region Skåne/Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
    2. Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
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  • Manuscript handled by: F. R. Rosendaal
  • Final decision: F. R. Rosendaal, 18 December 2013

Summary

Background

Data concerning the importance of a family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for the risk of recurrent VTE are sparse. The aim of this nationwide study was to determine whether a family history of VTE is a risk factor for recurrent hospitalization for unprovoked VTE (deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremities or pulmonary embolism).

Methods

We linked Multigeneration Register data on individuals aged 0–77 years to the Swedish nationwide Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1987–2009 to compare the risk of hospitalization for unprovoked recurrent VTE among individuals with and without a parental or sibling history of VTE. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) to determine the familial HR for recurrent hospitalization for VTE.

Results and Conclusions

The risk of recurrent VTE hospitalization was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10–1.32) for individuals with affected parents, and 1.30 (95% CI 1.14–1.49) for those with affected siblings. The risk of recurrent VTE hospitalization in individuals with two affected parents was 1.92 (95% CI 1.44–2.58). There was an interaction between age at diagnosis of VTE and a family history of VTE, with a family history having a stronger effect on VTE risk in younger patients. We conclude that a family history of VTE is a modest risk factor for recurrent VTE hospitalization in Sweden.

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