Does IL28B genotyping still have a role in the era of direct-acting antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection?

Authors

  • J. A. Holmes,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, St, Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
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  • P. V. Desmond,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, St, Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
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  • A. J. Thompson

    Corresponding author
    1. Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, North Melbourne, Vic., Australia
    2. Department of Gastroenterology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, USA
    • Department of Gastroenterology, St, Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
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Correspondence: Dr Alexander Thompson, MBBS, PhD, FRACP, Head of Hepatology Research, Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, 35 Victoria Parade, Fitzroy 3065, Vic., Australia. E-mail: alexander.thompson@svhm.org.au

Summary

IL28B genotype has been shown to be the strongest pretreatment predictor of sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC) treated with pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Patients carrying the good response genotype have a two- to threefold higher chance of SVR than those with a poor response genotype, manifest as dramatically improved early viral kinetics. However, the treatment paradigm for CHC is changing with the introduction of potent direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). IL28B genotype remains relevant to both telaprevir and boceprevir treatment regimens, although the strength of association with virological response is attenuated. The association between IL28B genotype and outcomes of treatment regimens that involve peg-IFN plus combination DAA therapy, or IFN-free regimens, is currently being evaluated. IL28B genotype may remain relevant to individualizing the choice of treatment regimen in the future.

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