• Open Access

A Randomized Study Assessing the Effect of Diet in Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Authors

  • L.M. Freeman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA
    • Corresponding author: L.M. Freeman, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536; e-mail: lisa.freeman@tufts.edu.

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  • J.E. Rush,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA
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  • S.M. Cunningham,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA
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  • B.J. Bulmer

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Tufts Veterinary Emergency Treatment & Specialties, Walpole, MA
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  • Presented, in part, at the 2013 ACVIM Forum, Seattle, WA

Abstract

Background

Diet might influence progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).

Objective

To investigate whether diet composition could alter clinical, biochemical, or echocardiographic variables in cats with HCM.

Animals

Twenty-nine cats with HCM (International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council stage 1b) examined at a university teaching hospital.

Methods

Randomized, placebo-controlled trial. After physical examination, echocardiogram, and blood collection, cats were randomized to 1 of 3 diets, which varied in carbohydrate and fat content and ingredients. Measurements were repeated after 6 months.

Results

There were no significant differences among the 3 groups at baseline. After 6 months, there were no significant changes in the primary endpoints, left ventricular free wall (Group A, = .760; Group B, = .475; Group C, = .066) or interventricular septal thickness in diastole (Group A, = .528; Group B, = .221; Group C, = .097). Group A had significant increases in BUN (= .008) and cholesterol (= .021), while Group B had significant increases in BUN (= .008), cholesterol (= .007), and triglycerides (= .005), and significant decreases in NT-proBNP (= .013) and hs-troponin I (= .043). Group C had significant decreases in body weight (= .021), left atrial dimension (= .035), interventricular septal thickness in systole (= .038), and liver enzymes (= .034–.038).

Conclusions and Clinical Importance

These data suggest that diet might influence some clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic variables in cats with HCM.

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