• Open Access

ISO-Based Assessment of Accuracy and Precision of Glucose Meters in Dogs

Authors

  • Y. Brito-Casillas,

    1. Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno Infantil de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
    2. Instituto Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
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  • P. Figueirinhas,

    1. Hospital Clínico Veterinario, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Arucas, Spain
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  • J.C. Wiebe,

    1. Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno Infantil de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
    2. Instituto Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
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  • L. López-Ríos,

    1. Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno Infantil de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
    2. Instituto Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
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  • D. Pérez-Barreto,

    1. Departamento de Patología Animal, Producción Animal, Bromatología y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Arucas, Spain
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  • C. Melián,

    1. Instituto Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
    2. Hospital Clínico Veterinario, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Arucas, Spain
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  • A.M. Wägner

    Corresponding author
    1. Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno Infantil de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
    2. Instituto Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
    • Corresponding author: Dr A.M. Wägner, Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno Infantil de Gran Canaria, Av. Marítima del Sur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, España; e-mail: ana.wagner@ulpgc.es.

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  • All work was performed at the Hospital Clínico Veterinario, ULPGC, Trasmontaña s/n, Arucas, Gran Canaria, Spain.
  • Two posters containing preliminary results were presented at the 22nd Congress of the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Maastricht, 6–8th September 2012, and the 12th Congress of the Federation for European Laboratory Animal Science Associations, Barcelona, 10–13th June 2013.

Abstract

Background

Portable blood glucose meters (PBGMs) allow easy glucose measurements. As animal-specific PBGMs are not available everywhere, those for humans are widely used.

Objectives

To assess the accuracy and precision of 9 PBGMs in canine whole blood (WB) and plasma, based on the ISO 15197:2013.

Animals

Fifty-nine client-owned dogs attending the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Methods

Analytical evaluation of 100 blood samples was performed for accuracy and 23 for precision (glucose 29–579 mg/dL) following ISO recommendations. A PBGM was considered accurate if 95% of the measurements were within ±15 mg/dL from the reference when glucose was <100 mg/dL and within ±15% when it was ≥100 mg/dL, and if 99% of them were within zones A and B in error grid analysis (EG). A hexokinase-based analyzer was used as reference. Ninety samples were assessed for hematocrit interferences.

Results

Accuracy requirements were not fulfilled by any PBGM in WB (74% of measurements within the limits for the most accurate) and by 1 only in plasma. However, the EG analysis in WB was passed by 6 PBGM and by all in plasma. The most accurate were also the most precise, with coefficients of variation <5% in WB and <3% in plasma. Hematocrit correlated with bias against the reference method in 4 PBGM (r = −0.243 − [−0.371]; P < .021).

Conclusions and Clinical Importance

This disparity among PBGM suggests that meters approved for humans need to be evaluated before use in other species.

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