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Evaluation of regional limb perfusion with erythromycin using the saphenous, cephalic, or palmar digital veins in standing horses

Authors

  • G. Kelmer,

    Corresponding authorCurrent affiliation:
    1. Department of Large Animal, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
    • Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
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  • T. Martin-Jimenez,

    1. Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
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  • A. M. Saxton,

    1. Department of Animal Science, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
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  • C. Catasus,

    1. Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
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  • S. B. Elliot,

    1. Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
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  • J. Lakritz

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 37, Issue 1, 103, Article first published online: 10 January 2014

  • The study was performed at the University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN, USA.

Gal Kelmer, Department of Large Animal, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Beit Dagan, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot, Israel. E-mail: galkelmer@hotmail.com

Abstract

There are no reported studies evaluating the use of erythromycin for regional limb perfusion (RLP) in horses. Our hypothesis was that using the cephalic and saphenous veins for RLP will enable delivery of therapeutic concentrations of erythromycin to the distal limb. Nineteen healthy horses participated in the study. The cephalic, saphenous or palmar digital (PD) vein was used to perfuse the limb with erythromycin. Synovial samples were collected from the metacarpo/metatarso-phalangeal (MCP/MTP) joint and blood samples were collected from the jugular vein. Maximum concentration (Cmax) of erythromycin in the MCP joint using the cephalic vein was 113 mg/L. The Cmax of erythromycin in the MTP joint using the saphenous vein was 38 mg/L. Erythromycin administered using the PD vein was not detectable in the MCP/MTP joint of four of six horses. Concentrations of erythromycin achieved in the synovial fluid of the MCP/MTP joint were between 152 and 452 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Rhodococcus equi (R. equi). In conclusion, the results indicate that when using the saphenous or cephalic veins for RLP, therapeutic concentrations of erythromycin in the MTP/MTP joint can be consistently reached.

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