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Disposition of methylprednisolone acetate in plasma, urine, and synovial fluid following intra-articular administration to exercised thoroughbred horses

Authors

  • H. K. Knych,

    Corresponding author
    1. K.L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
    2. Department of Veterinary Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
    • Dr Heather K. Knych, K.L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Health Science Drive, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. E-mail: hkknych@ucdavis.edu

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  • L. M. Harrison,

    1. Willow Oak Equine, Woodland, CA, USA
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  • H. C. Casbeer,

    1. K.L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
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  • D. S. McKemie

    1. K.L. Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
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Abstract

Methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) is commonly administered to performance horses, and therefore, establishing appropriate withdrawal times prior to performance is critical. The objectives of this study were to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of MPA and time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following intra-articular administration to sixteen racing fit adult Thoroughbred horses. Horses received a single intra-articular administration of MPA (100 mg). Blood, urine, and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to and at various times up to 77 days postdrug administration and analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Maximum measured plasma MPA concentrations were 6.06 ± 1.57 at 0.271 days (6.5 h; range: 5.0–7.92 h) and 6.27 ± 1.29 ng/mL at 0.276 days (6.6 h; range: 4.03–12.0 h) for horses that had synovial fluid collected (group 1) and those that did not (group 2), respectively. The plasma terminal half-life was 1.33 ± 0.80 and 0.843 ± 0.414 days for groups 1 and 2, respectively. MPA was undetectable by day 6.25 ± 2.12 (group 1) and 4.81 ± 2.56 (group 2) in plasma and day 17 (group 1) and 14 (group 2) in urine. MPA concentrations in synovial fluid remained above the limit of detection (LOD) for up to 77 days following intra-articular administration, suggesting that plasma and urine concentrations are not a good indicator of synovial fluid concentrations.

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