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Effect of sucralfate on oral minocycline absorption in healthy dogs

Authors

  • K. KuKanich,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
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  • B. KuKanich,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
    • Butch KuKanich, Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, 211 Coles Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. E-mail: kukanich@ksu.edu

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  • A. Harris,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
    2. Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
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  • E. Heinrich

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
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Abstract

Sucralfate and minocycline may be administered concurrently to dogs. The relative bioavailability of tetracyclines may be reduced if administered with sucralfate, but studies confirming these interactions in dogs are not available. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of oral minocycline in dogs (M), determined the effects of concurrent administration of sucralfate and minocycline (MS) on minocycline pharmacokinetics, determined the effects of delaying sucralfate administration by 2 h (MS+2) on minocycline pharmacokinetics, and established dosing recommendations based on pharmacodynamic indices. Oral minocycline (300 mg) and sucralfate suspension (1 g) were administered to five greyhounds in a randomized crossover design. Minocycline plasma concentrations were evaluated using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The maximum plasma concentration (CMAX) and area under the curve (AUC) of minocycline were 1.15 μg/mL and 8.0 h* μg/mL, respectively. The CMAX and AUC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the MS group (CMAX = 0.33 μg/mL, AUC 3.0 h*μg/mL) compared with M or MS+2 (CMAX = 0.97 μg/mL, AUC 10.3 h*μg/mL). Delaying sucralfate by 2 h did not decrease oral minocycline absorption, but concurrent administration significantly decreased minocycline absorption. A dose of 7.5 mg/kg p.o. q12 h achieves the pharmacodynamic index for a bacterial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.25 μg/mL (AUC:MIC≥33.9).

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