Journal of Vegetation Science

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 1

February 2012

Volume 23, Issue 1

Pages 1–200

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Orginal Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Reviewers List
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      Editors’ Award, experimental approaches, functional traits and ecoinformatics (pages 1–3)

      J. Bastow Wilson, Alessandro Chiarucci, Milan Chytrý and Meelis Pärtel

      Version of Record online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01374.x

  2. Orginal Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Orginal Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Reviewers List
    1. Initial species pattern affects invasion resistance in experimental grassland plots (pages 4–12)

      Kathryn A. Yurkonis, Brian J. Wilsey and Kirk A. Moloney

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01331.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a field experiment asking if initial species pattern affects diversity and invasion in a perennial grassland, we found that invader abundance was consistently greater in plots planted with larger conspecific patches. Findings support the hypothesis that invasion resistance increases as communities become more heterogeneous and suggest that fine-scale heterogeneity should be considered when assessing invasion resistance in perennial communities.

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Orginal Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Reviewers List
    1. The right relevé in the right vegetation unit: a new typicality index to reproduce expert judgement with an automatic classification programme (pages 24–32)

      Jean-Claude Gégout and Christophe Coudun

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01337.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new typicality index was formalized to quantify the probability of automatically classifying a given releve’ in the same vegetation unit as an expert in phytosociology would do. This typicality index, based on criteria of uncertainty used by phytosociological experts, allows to distinguish in the vegetation databases plots with strong heritage interest covering habitats from the European Natura 2000 directive.

    2. Invasive non-native species attributes and invasion extent: examining the importance of grain size (pages 33–40)

      Munemitsu Akasaka, Masayuki Takada, Rie Kitagawa and Hiroshi Igarashi

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01332.x

    3. Responses of grassland species richness to local and landscape factors depend on spatial scale and habitat specialization (pages 41–51)

      Triin Reitalu, Oliver Purschke, Lotten J. Johansson, Karin Hall, Martin T. Sykes and Honor C. Prentice

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01334.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Species richness of grassland specialist and habitat generalist vascular plants was analyzed at two scales (plots and grassland patches) in relation to a series of local and landscape factors. The richness of both specialists and generalists was highest in old, well-grazed, heterogeneous grasslands. Richness of grassland specialists was negatively influenced by grassland fragmentation but positively associated with surrounding habitat diversity.

    4. Unexpected mechanisms sustain the stress gradient hypothesis in a tropical alpine environment (pages 62–72)

      Fabien Anthelme, Belen Buendia, Charlotte Mazoyer and Olivier Dangles

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01333.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Facilitative effects by Azorella aretioides on other plants corroborate predictions of the ‘stress gradient hypothesis’ (SGH) for the first time in a tropical alpine environment. Facilitation was sustained by increased nutrient and water content in soils. This result differed from what has been described in alpine environments at higher latitude so far, thus extending the framework of the SGH.

  4. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Orginal Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Reviewers List
    1. Primary succession trajectories on pumice at Mount St. Helens, Washington (pages 73–85)

      Roger del Moral, Lindsay A. Thomason, Anthony C. Wenke, Natasha Lozanoff and Mario D. Abata

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01336.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We compared primary succession trajectories on pumice. Community types have become internally more homogeneous and they became more similar to each other. Over the 22 years of the study, local habitat factors unexpectedly remained stronger than position effects, but no combination of factors was an effective predictor of patterns. Subtle habitat differences and priority effects constrain convergence.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Orginal Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Reviewers List
    1. Disturbance history of an old-growth sub-alpine Picea abies stand in the Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic (pages 86–97)

      Miroslav Svoboda, Pavel Janda, Thomas A. Nagel, Shawn Fraver, Jan Rejzek and Radek Bače

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01329.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      What historical natural disturbances have shaped the structure and development of an old-growth, subalpine Picea abies forest? Our study provides strong evidence that these forests were historically shaped by infrequent, moderate- to high-severity natural disturbances. It seems reasonable to assume the interaction of wind storms and bark beetles seen in the contemporary landscape has occurred historically.

    2. Disentangling plant trait responses to livestock grazing from spatio-temporal variation: the partial RLQ approach (pages 98–113)

      Dirk Wesuls, Jens Oldeland and Stéphane Dray

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01342.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We sampled from grazing gradients in African savannas and wanted to know which plant traits consistently respond to grazing in different years and across habitat related environmental heterogeneity. With the new partial RLQ trait analysis approach we were able to partition environmental variation and could show that some of the traits varied in response to both spatio-temporal variability and grazing.

    3. Patterns and controls of above-ground net primary production in meadows of Patagonia. A remote sensing approach (pages 114–126)

      J. Gonzalo N. Irisarri, Martín Oesterheld, José M. Paruelo and Marcos A. Texeira

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01326.x

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum

      Vol. 23, Issue 4, 803, Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2012

    4. Influences of watershed geomorphology on extent and composition of riparian vegetation (pages 127–139)

      Blake M. Engelhardt, Peter J. Weisberg and Jeanne C. Chambers

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01328.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We analyzed the relationships between the distribution of riparian plant community types and geomorphology at the whole-watershed scale across 18 mountain watersheds in central Nevada, USA. We observed strong effects of watershed morphometry and geology for predicting vegetation composition, and for constraining relative abundance of woody versus herbaceous vegetation. Consideration of watershed-scale geomorphology can improve prediction and inform restoration efforts.

    5. Sudden oak death disease progression across two forest types and spatial scales (pages 151–163)

      Benjamin S. Ramage, Alison B. Forrestel, Max A. Moritz and Kevin L. O'Hara

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01340.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Disease progression differed with forest type, but was unaffected by other pre-existing environmental variables. Tanoak mortality rates were higher in areas with greater prior mortality (at two different spatial scales), suggesting predictable expansion of mortality foci following stochastic infections. Annual mortality rates ranged from 3.2% to 26.2% depending upon forest type and stage of disease progression.

    6. Juvenile–adult tree associations in a continental Mediterranean ecosystem: no evidence for sustained and general facilitation at increased aridity (pages 164–175)

      Elena Granda, Adrián Escudero, Marcelino de la Cruz and Fernando Valladares

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01343.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Juveniles and adults of four co-occurring tree species were mapped to study inter- and intra-specific interactions. Results suggest that positive interactions do not increase in importance with increasing aridity in the study system, being regeneration patterns species-specific and dependent on microhabitat characteristics, water availability and dispersal strategies. This work contributes to the understanding of species co-existence in continental Mediterranean ecosystems.

    7. Individual-based trait analyses reveal assembly patterns in tree sapling communities (pages 176–186)

      Marcos B. Carlucci, Helena Streit, Leandro D.S. Duarte and Valério D. Pillar

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01339.x

    8. Reconstructing savanna tree cover from pollen, phytoliths and stable carbon isotopes (pages 187–197)

      Julie Aleman, Bérangère Leys, Roger Apema, Ilham Bentaleb, Marc A. Dubois, Barthélémy Lamba, Judicaël Lebamba, Céline Martin, Alfred Ngomanda, Loïc Truc, Jean-Michel Yangakola, Charly Favier and Laurent Bremond

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2011.01335.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pollen and phytolith records in soil are related to savanna woody cover. A quantitative multiproxy model linking the Leaf Area Index (LAI) to the ratio of arboreal to non-arboreal pollen (AP/NAP) and the ratio of dicotyledons to Poaceae phytoliths (D/P) was calibrated. This model can be applied in palaeosequences to help vegetation changes interpretation.

  6. Reviewers List

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Orginal Articles
    4. Original Articles
    5. Original articles
    6. Original Articles
    7. Reviewers List

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