Journal of Vegetation Science

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 24, Issue 1

Pages 1–208

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentaries
    4. Ordinary Articles
    5. Book Review
    6. Reviewers List
    1. You have free access to this content
      Functional types, climatic change and species richness (pages 1–3)

      J. Bastow Wilson, Alessandro Chiarucci, Milan Chytrý and Meelis Pärtel

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12017

  2. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentaries
    4. Ordinary Articles
    5. Book Review
    6. Reviewers List
    1. You have free access to this content
      Striving for general validity: a huge sample reveals faint traces in forests (pages 4–6)

      Otto Wildi

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Species composition in forest patches is influenced by distance-to-edge within an average range 748 m. Pellissier et al., in this issue, assess the significance of this pattern using a very large data set, a well-defined target population and comprehensive logistic models. This is a recipe for overcoming the lack of general validity frequently observed in vegetation science.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Moving towards the edge: matrix matters! (pages 7–8)

      Sara A.O. Cousins

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12019

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      In this issue of the Journal of Vegetation Science, Chabrerie et al. use plant inventories and geographical data to investigate effects on species richness and turnover caused by management intensity in the surrounding matrix in new and old forest fragments. Although forest-edge age was important, more intensive management of the matrix clearly sharpened the edge–interior gradient.

  3. Ordinary Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentaries
    4. Ordinary Articles
    5. Book Review
    6. Reviewers List
    1. You have free access to this content
      Understorey plant species show long-range spatial patterns in forest patches according to distance-to-edge (pages 9–24)

      Vincent Pellissier, Laurent Bergès, Théodora Nedeltcheva, Marie-Cécile Schmitt, Catherine Avon, Catherine Cluzeau and Jean-Luc Dupouey

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01435.x

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      Periphery-to-core patterns of distribution were detected over much larger ranges (>750 m) than previously recognised for common understory plant species in 1801 forest patches of Northern France. Plant traits differentiated forest-core from forest-periphery species. This deep gradient could be due to the long-term persistence of land-use history and edge displacement following general reforestation since 1830.

    2. Intra-specific spatial aggregation in acidic grasslands: effects of acidification and nitrogen deposition on spatial patterns of plant communities (pages 25–32)

      Christian Damgaard, Rasmus Ejrnæs and Carly J. Stevens

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01438.x

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      It is an old notion that pattern and process are linked in plant communities. Here the spatial pattern of plant community pin-point cover data are summarized and regressed to various environmental drivers. We hypothesise that spatial aggregation in semi-natural grasslands will increase with increasing eutrophication and acidification.

    3. Partitioning the variation of woody plant β-diversity in a landscape of secondary tropical dry forests across spatial scales (pages 33–45)

      J.O. López-Martínez, J.L. Hernández-Stefanoni, J.M. Dupuy and J.A. Meave

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01446.x

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      We investigated the relative importance of successional age, environmental heterogeneity, landscape structure and spatial structure on β-diversity of tropical dry forests at different spatial scales. The magnitude of β-diversity decreased with increasing spatial grain and successional age. Both the environment and the spatial structure influenced β-diversity at the local grain size, environmental factors were more important at the landscape grain.

    4. Community disassembly and reassembly following experimental storm surge and wrack application (pages 46–57)

      Anthony S. Tate and Loretta L. Battaglia

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01447.x

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      Climate change may produce more intense hurricanes with storm surges that reach more inland plant communities. Substantial amounts of dead herbaceous and woody plant material, collectively called wrack, are deposited on the landward edge of storm surges. The salinity stress inflicted by storm surge and the burial effect of wrack cause significant vegetation shifts in coastal pine savanna ecosystems.

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      Maturation of forest edges is constrained by neighbouring agricultural land management (pages 58–69)

      Olivier Chabrerie, Aurélien Jamoneau, Emilie Gallet-Moron and Guillaume Decocq

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01449.x

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      Forest fragments are part of our contemporary agricultural landscapes. As fragments are aging, plant species accumulate and environmental gradients progressively develop at the forest edge, especially with respect to light availability and litter thickness. However, plant communities poorly reflect these gradients under the constraint of neighbouring landscape management: the stronger the management intensity, the sharper the edge-interior gradient.

    6. Local plant species delimitation in a highly diverse Amazonian forest: do we all see the same species? (pages 70–79)

      Ana C.S. Gomes, Ana Andrade, Juan S. Barreto-Silva, Tania Brenes-Arguedas, Dairon C. López, Camila C. de Freitas, Carla Lang, Alexandre A. de Oliveira, Alvaro J. Pérez, Rolando Perez, João B. da Silva, Alexandra M.F. Silveira, Marcel C. Vaz, Juliana Vendrami and Alberto Vicentini

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01441.x

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      Poor taxonomic knowledge, lack of tools and high diversity limit our ability to recognize plant species in Amazon forest plot inventories. While the identification of species is a well-known problem, the delimitation of local species is considered unproblematic. We show that local species delimitation is also prone to large uncertainties, and that botanical experience may not reduce them.

    7. Updating vegetation classifications: an example with New Zealand's woody vegetation (pages 80–93)

      Susan K. Wiser and Miquel De Cáceres

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01450.x

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      How can existing vegetation classifications be updated when new data are obtained? Our analysis illustrates the application of a fuzzy classification framework at a national scale and provides a model for others wishing to extend and update vegetation classifications. Our approach allows rare community types to be defined and identifies portions of compositional and geographic gradients that are poorly documented.

    8. Does complementarity in leaf phenology and inclination promote co-existence in a species-rich meadow? Evidence from functional groups (pages 94–100)

      Norman W. H. Mason, Nataša Pipenbaher, Sonja Škornik and Mitja Kaligarič

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01451.x

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      Functional groups provide a rapid assessment of interspecific resource use complementarity. However, it remains unclear whether functional groups can reveal mechanisms of co-existence. We found that species in different leaf inclination and phenology functional groups co-occured more frequently than expected in a species-rich meadow. This suggests light partitioning and seasonal differences in resource use may explain co-existence in species-rich meadows.

    9. Land-use impact on the growth and survival of seedlings and saplings in West African savannas (pages 101–112)

      Katrin Jurisch, Karen Hahn, Rüdiger Wittig and Markus Bernhardt-Römermann

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01444.x

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      The survival and growth of seedlings and saplings of woody savanna species was monitored over five seasons and analyzed using multistate capture-recapture models. We detected six groups of species with similar survival and transition probabilities. Each of these groups contained species preferring different habitat conditions and land use types, but most species developed best in unprotected areas.

    10. Four years of simulated climate change reduces above-ground productivity and alters functional diversity in a grassland ecosystem (pages 113–126)

      Amélie A. M. Cantarel, Juliette M. G. Bloor and Jean-François Soussana

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01452.x

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      We examined temperate grassland dynamics in response to simultaneous, multiple climate changes. Exposure to projected climatic conditions for 2080 had a progressively-negative effect on annual aboveground biomass production, driven primarily by ecosystem responses to warming. Climate treatment had no effect on plant species diversity, but variation in plant traits and functional diversity was linked to patterns in aboveground productivity.

    11. Do we need soil moisture measurements in the vegetation–environment studies in wetlands? (pages 127–137)

      Michal Hájek, Petra Hájková, Martin Kočí, Martin Jiroušek, Eva Mikulášková and Kateřina Kintrová

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01440.x

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      We tested whether volumetric soil moisture, measured directly in vertical profiles using electromagnetic sensors (photo), correlates with mire vegetation composition better than water table. We found that water level still serves as a better proxy of complex conditions related to the hydrological regime. Sphagnum-fens displayed stronger correlation between water level and soil moisture than bogs and, especially, than calcareous fens.

    12. Differential water uptake among plant species in humid alpine meadows (pages 138–147)

      Xin Leng, Jun Cui, Shiting Zhang, Wenguang Zhang, Yuhong Liu, Shirong Liu and Shuqing An

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01439.x

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      This paper revealed inter-specific differentiation in plant water use in the humid alpine meadows of western China. Analysis of stable isotopic signal of plants and soils indicated that alpine plants absorbed water from different soil depths and responded differentially to rain pulses. This finding may have important implications for species coexistence and the high plant diversity of alpine meadows.

    13. Short-term succession of aquatic plant species richness along ecosystem productivity and dispersal gradients in shallow lakes (pages 148–156)

      F. Arthaud, D. Vallod, J. Robin, A. Wezel and G. Bornette

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01436.x

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      In this study, we analysed the effect of the lake productivity and the lake connectivity on the relationship between aquatic plant species richness and the succession stage. These factors affected the dynamics of species richness through succession and they should be taken into account in further developments of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis.

    14. Flow regulation is associated with riverine soil seed bank composition within an agricultural landscape: potential implications for restoration (pages 157–167)

      Joe Greet, Roger D. Cousens and J. Angus Webb

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01445.x

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      Our results suggest that flow regulation affects the composition of riverine seed banks. This is likely to be driven by changes to the extant vegetation, and patterns of germination and waterborne dispersal. Our study corroborates previous research suggesting that regulation affects riverine seed bank dynamics, and that natural flow timing is important for the recruitment of native riverine plants.

    15. Compounded disturbances in sub-alpine forests in western Colorado favour future dominance by quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) (pages 168–176)

      Dominik Kulakowski, Carolyn Matthews, Daniel Jarvis and Thomas T. Veblen

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01437.x

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      Due to a global increase in climatically-driven disturbances, it is becoming increasingly likely that ecosystems may be affected by multiple types of disturbance in short succession. We found that subalpine forest regeneration following compounded versus single disturbances varies in density and composition, which may contribute to an increased complexity of potential post-disturbance stand trajectories and/or lead to alternate stable states.

    16. Low tolerance of New Caledonian secondary forest species to savanna fires (pages 177–188)

      Thomas Ibanez, Thomas Curt and Christelle Hely

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01448.x

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      We used a combination of allometric relationships and models of fire behaviour with fire injuries to assess how savanna and early secondary successional forest species differ in their tolerance to fires. We showed that the tolerance of these species to fire is highly variable and that the investment in bark thickness seems to be the prevailing trait that differentiates them.

    17. Causes for the unimodal pattern of biomass and productivity in alpine grasslands along a large altitudinal gradient in semi-arid regions (pages 189–201)

      Zhong Wang, Tianxiang Luo, Ruicheng Li, Yanhong Tang and Mingyuan Du

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.01442.x

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      Above- and below-ground biomass of alpine grasslands along a large altitudinal gradient in central Tibetan Plateau showed a quadratic relationship with the ratio of growing season precipitation to ≥5°C accumulated temperature. This suggests that plant productivity of alpine grasslands in semi-arid regions is mainly limited by drought at low altitudes but by low temperature at high altitudes.

  4. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentaries
    4. Ordinary Articles
    5. Book Review
    6. Reviewers List
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Reviewers List

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentaries
    4. Ordinary Articles
    5. Book Review
    6. Reviewers List
    1. Reviewers List (pages 205–208)

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12014

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