Journal of Vegetation Science

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 6

November 2013

Volume 24, Issue 6

Pages 975–1211

  1. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Original Articles
    4. Report
    5. Forum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Extended leaf phenology: a secret of successful invaders? (pages 975–976)

      Marcel Rejmánek

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12116

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      Smith (2013), in this issue, reviews the consequences of extended leaf phenology of invasive plant species in native deciduous forests. How important is early leaf emergence and/or late leaf senescence for the success of non-native species? What are the direct and indirect impacts on invaded communities and ecosystems? We are just at the very early stage in answering such questions.

    2. You have free access to this content
      How traits determine species responses to environmental gradients (pages 977–978)

      Peter A. Vesk

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12117

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      The role traits play in species distributions is central to developing a mechanistic and predictive plant ecology. Developments in Generalized Linear Mixed Models described by Jamil et al. in this issue provide a significant step in this endeavour. Trait-based GLMMs are intuitive parametric models for exploring and predicting the distribution of species along environmental gradients as affected by species traits.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Original Articles
    4. Report
    5. Forum
    1. Extended leaf phenology in deciduous forest invaders: mechanisms of impact on native communities (pages 979–987)

      L.M. Smith

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12087

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      Many plant invaders of Eastern deciduous forests exhibit extended leaf phenology compared to natives. Beyond providing invaders an advantage in resource competition, extended leaf phenology may have diverse community-level effects by changing interactions between plants and their enemies, mutualists, and competitors. Investigating the role of leaf phenology in invasion will inform our understanding of seasonality in shaping species interactions.

    2. Selecting traits that explain species–environment relationships: a generalized linear mixed model approach (pages 988–1000)

      Tahira Jamil, Wim A. Ozinga, Michael Kleyer and Cajo J.F. ter Braak

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1654-1103.2012.12036.x

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      We propose a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) for the functional response of species to environmental change. The model can be used to identify which functional traits and environmental variables are significantly related and which best explain the species distribution. We argue that the method is better suited for providing an interpretable model than the fourth corner method and RLQ.

    3. Clonal traits outperform foliar traits as predictors of ecosystem function in experimental mesocosms (pages 1001–1009)

      Anne-Kristel Bittebiere, Bernard Clément and Cendrine Mony

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12015

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      Based on a wide-scale mesocosm experiment comprising several assemblages of species differing in clonal traits, we demonstrated that these traits can be better predictors of the production function than foliar traits at the individual and the community scales. These traits were indicators of resource acquisition processes mediated by competitive interactions.

    4. Quantification of plant dispersal ability within and beyond a calcareous grassland (pages 1010–1019)

      Jacqueline C. Diacon-Bolli, Peter J. Edwards, Harald Bugmann, Christoph Scheidegger and Helene H. Wagner

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12024

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      Habitat loss, fragmentation and abandonment of traditional management practices have reduced connectivity by seed flow between Europe‘s calcareous grassland patches. Here we quantify the wind dispersal ability of calcareous grassland species using funnel traps. We show that dispersal into the adjacent landscape is species-specific and conclude that natural regeneration even over short distances should not rely on wind dispersal alone.

    5. Plant competition and facilitation after extreme drought episodes in Mediterranean shrubland: does damage to vegetation cover trigger replacement by juniper woodland? (pages 1020–1032)

      Francisco Lloret and Iñigo Granzow-de la Cerda

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12030

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      The study illustrates the outcome of competence and facilitation to community dynamics under a climate change scenario where extreme climatic episodes are becoming more frequent. Empirical data from a Mediterranean shrubland subjected to successional replacement, shows that drought events disrupt this dynamics diminishing the facilitative effect of shrubland cover on the establishment of juveniles of the short tree Juniperus phoenicea.

    6. Competition between young exotic invasive and native dominant plant species: implications for invasions within riparian areas (pages 1033–1042)

      Marion Bottollier-Curtet, Anne-Marie Planty-Tabacchi and Eric Tabacchi

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12034

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      Mean competition effect (± 95 %-bootstrap confidence interval) on the individual biomass according the origin of the species. Considering five exotic invasive and five native dominant plant species, we found that the exotics produced more biomass than the natives in 73 % of the selected species pairs. The exotic species had higher competitiveness than the natives, mainly related to the high competitiveness of I. glandulifera. The two species which displayed the lowest production and competitive abilities were natives.

    7. Effect of propagule pressure on recovery of a California grassland after an extreme disturbance (pages 1043–1052)

      Loralee Larios, Rebecca J. Aicher and Katharine N. Suding

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12039

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      A severe drought paired with an extensive wildlife created an extreme disturbance in Southern California grasslands. Our study shows that the recovery after such an extreme disturbance is driven by landscape dispersal processes, where the propagule pressure from neighboring exotic annual grasses can hinder the recovery of slower growing native perennial dominated grasslands.

    8. Hierarchical effects of rainfall, nurse plants, granivory and seed banks on cactus recruitment (pages 1053–1061)

      J. Nathaniel Holland and Francisco Molina-Freaner

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12021

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      Our results show the hierarchical effects that shape seedling recruitment of a desert cactus, namely the predominant effects of rainfall in increasing recruitment and of granivory in decreasing recruitment. It is primarily under adequate rainfall conditions that nurse plants play a key role in increasing seedling recruitment and survival.

    9. The effects of litter accumulation through succession on seed bank formation for small- and large-seeded species (pages 1062–1073)

      Chika Egawa and Shiro Tsuyuzaki

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12037

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      We found that the patterns of secondary seed dispersal and buried seed viability varied with litter accumulation through succession in a peatland. Small seeds passed through the litter and formed a persistent seedbank at the peat surface, while large seeds developed a transient seedbank within the litter. The temporal changes in litter thickness can control the spatial distribution of seedbank.

    10. Aluminium toxic effects on seedling root survival affect plant composition along soil reaction gradients – a case study in dry sandy grasslands (pages 1074–1085)

      M. Abedi, M. Bartelheimer and P. Poschlod

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12016

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      Seedling roots of species from Central European sandy grasslands were exposed to different concentrations of aluminium (Al). Al-tolerance was found to strongly correlate with Ellenberg-indicator-values for soil reaction. Hence, Al acts as an environmental filter in acidic soils by allowing only Al-tolerant seedlings to grow roots. Al-tolerance is a measurable objective trait with the potential to underpin subjectively derived Ellenberg-indicator-values.

    11. Micro-scale habitat associations of woody plants in a neotropical cloud forest (pages 1086–1097)

      Alicia Ledo, David F.R.P. Burslem, Sonia Condés and Fernando Montes

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12023

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      We studied tree species-habitat associations within three 1 ha plots in a Peruvian cloud forest. The micro-scale distributions of canopy species were sensitive to topographic conditions, while low stature species were more sensitive to forest structure. We demonstrate that the inclusion of both topographic and forest structure variables in habitat association analyses provides a greater evidence of micro-habitat partitioning than analyses incorporating either set of variables in isolation. We conclude that micro-scale habitat associations contribute to the maintenance of species richness in this neotropical montane forest.

    12. Co-occurring grazing and climate stressors have different effects on the total seed bank when compared to the persistent seed bank (pages 1098–1107)

      Carlos I. Espinosa, Arantzazu L. Luzuriaga, Marcelino de la Cruz, Marianne Montero and Adrián Escudero

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12043

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      We wish to improve our understanding on the effect of plant patch on soil seed bank properties and, more specifically, how these seed reservoirs (seed bank patches) are affected by biotic (i.e. herbivory) and abiotic (i.e. climate) stressors and how they interact with the standing vegetation. Our results showed that although climate is the primary factor determining soil seed bank properties, its effect was profoundly modulated by grazing, as suggested by the existence of an important interaction between both stressors. Not only seed abundance and richness but also the relative dominance of total and persistent seed banks was affected by both environmental stressors.

      Photo Credit: M. Smith

    13. How to model species responses along ecological gradients – Huisman–Olff–Fresco models revisited (pages 1108–1117)

      Florian Jansen and Jari Oksanen

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12050

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      The shape of species responses along ecological gradients is of great theoretical and practical interest. However, ecological species responses are influenced by many factors and cannot easily be generalized. We compare a hierarchical set of 7 logistic regression models (eHOF) with General Additive Models. eHOF models perform well and can be used to derive several species characteristics for further analyses.

    14. Vegetation–environment relationships in alpine mires of the West Carpathians and the Alps (pages 1118–1128)

      Lucia Sekulová, Michal Hájek and Vít Syrovátka

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12035

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      The manuscript deals with comparison of overall species composition and its variability and species richness in mires between two distant mountain ranges. The paper is based on original recently collected data, thus sampled using the same protocol and the same effort in bryophyte determinations, what allowed direct comparisons between vascular plants and bryophytes.

    15. Do vegetation boundaries display smooth or abrupt spatial transitions along environmental gradients? Evidence from the prairie–forest biome boundary of historic Minnesota, USA (pages 1129–1140)

      Nicholas P. Danz, Lee E. Frelich, Peter B. Reich and Gerald J. Niemi

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12028

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      We use data from a historical grassland-forest biome boundary to show that forest vegetation responds in a non-linear or threshold manner to comparatively gradual spatial changes in climate. Thus, modest climatic changes may have potential to cause substantial locational shifts in this biome boundary.

    16. Spatiotemporal differences in tree spatial patterns between alluvial hardwood and mountain fir–beech forests: do characteristic patterns exist? (pages 1141–1153)

      David Janik, Dušan Adam, Libor Hort, Kamil Král, Pavel Šamonil, Pavel Unar, Tomáš Vrška and David Horal

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12018

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      As alluvial hardwood forest and mountain fir-beech forest differ completely in a majority of characteristics, we expected significant differences between their tree spatial patterns too. Our study really demonstrated actual differences in tree spatial patterns of these forest types, although at surprising distances, and even in character. The main carrier of differences was the pattern of recruits and small-sized trees.

    17. Coupling ordination techniques and GAM to spatially predict vegetation assemblages along a climatic gradient in an ENSO-affected region of extremely high climate variability (pages 1154–1166)

      Jannes Muenchow, Hannes Feilhauer, Achim Bräuning, Eric F. Rodríguez, Fabian Bayer, Rodolfo A. Rodríguez and Henrik von Wehrden

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12038

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      We analyze the vegetation composition of an endangered tropical dry forest formation along a climatic gradient. The vegetation composition is related to climatic and edaphic factors for two meteorologically different La Niña years. Furthermore, we modeled the scores of an ordination with a map of the floristic gradient as a result. This novel approach allows to spatially depict vegetation assemblages.

    18. Individual-based approach to the detection of disturbance history through spatial scales in a natural beech-dominated forest (pages 1167–1184)

      Pavel Šamonil, Petra Doleželová, Ivana Vašíčková, Dušan Adam, Martin Valtera, Kamil Král, David Janík and Barbora Šebková

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12025

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      Effects of small-scale disturbances predominate in forest dynamics. The Kyrill storm (18th Jan 2007) represented a singular event in the forest history from the point of view of its exceptional spatial pattern, but not from the perspective of disturbance intensity. The ecological role of disturbance is biased if disturbance intensity is used as the sole criterion.

    19. Correlations between genetic and species diversity: effects of resource quantity and heterogeneity (pages 1185–1194)

      Meghan L. Avolio and Melinda D. Smith

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12042

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      In tallgrass prairie, the genetic diversity of the dominant species Andropogon gerardii is not related to plant community diversity. Here, we investigate how environmental resources, their quantity and heterogeneity, might affect correlations between these two levels of plant diversity. We found that species and genetic diversity are related to different environmental resources potentially explaining the lack of relationship.

      Photo Credit: M. Smith

    20. Mechanisms shaping plant biomass and species richness: plant strategies and litter effect in alkali and loess grasslands (pages 1195–1203)

      András Kelemen, Péter Török, Orsolya Valkó, Tamás Miglécz and Béla Tóthmérész

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12027

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      We found a humped-back relationship between total biomass and species richness. A negative litter effect on species richness was detected at much lower scores (from 400 g/m2) than reported in former studies. Our study revealed that litter can shape species richness along the whole biomass gradient, thus it is one of the major factors in structuring grassland biodiversity.

  3. Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Original Articles
    4. Report
    5. Forum
    1. The FORMNET-B database: monitoring the biomass and dynamics of disturbed and degraded tropical forests (pages 1204–1207)

      Percival Cho, George A. Blackburn, Neil M. Bird, Steven W. Brewer and Jos Barlow

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12103

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      Disturbed and degraded tropical forests have received little attention in long-term studies of forest dynamics. We present a database designed to monitor tropical forests in permanent plots as they transition from mature to degraded to recovering forests after various degrees of natural and anthropogenic disturbance. We describe the plot methodology, the plot disturbance history and the database structure and contents.

  4. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Original Articles
    4. Report
    5. Forum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Assessing the fire tolerance of forest species in New Caledonian savanna: modelling choices do matter (pages 1208–1211)

      Paulo M. Fernandes

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12086

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      Fire simulation modelling is a useful and insightful tool in fire ecology research, provided that modelling choices are thoughtful. Deceptive fire-vegetation relationships will emerge when model concepts and assumptions are overlooked or poorly understood and when model inputs are not representative.

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