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Studies of the Thermal and Haline Influences on Growth and Survival of Litopenaeus vannamei and Litopenaeus setiferus

Authors

  • Martin Perez-Velazquez,

    Corresponding author
    • Departamento de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas, Universidad de Sonora. Edificio 7-G, Boulevard Luis Donaldo Colosio s/n, e/Sahuaripa y Reforma, Col. Centro, C.P. 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
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  • Mayra L. González-Félix,

    1. Departamento de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas, Universidad de Sonora. Edificio 7-G, Boulevard Luis Donaldo Colosio s/n, e/Sahuaripa y Reforma, Col. Centro, C.P. 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
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  • D. A. Davis,

    1. Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures, Auburn University, 203 Swingle Hall, Auburn, Alabama 36849-5419, USA
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  • Luke A. Roy,

    1. Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures, Auburn University, 203 Swingle Hall, Auburn, Alabama 36849-5419, USA
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  • Xuezhi Zhu

    1. Institute of Aquatic Economic Animals, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, 135 Xingang, West Guangzhou 510275, China
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Corresponding author.

Abstract

A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effects of salinity (1–48 g/L) on the biological performance, as evaluated by growth and survival, of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and the Atlantic white shrimp, Litopenaeus setiferus, reared at temperatures of 20, 24 or 28 C. Poor growth and survival of L. vannamei was observed after 21–28 d of culture at low salinity (2 and 4 g/L) at 20 C. Raising salinity to 8 and up to 32 g/L significantly increased survival at this temperature, indicating that avoiding low temperatures is critical for survival of this species when reared at low salinity. A major improvement in the growth rate of L. vannamei was observed at 24 C, but it still was sub-optimal compared to growth observed at 28 C. Irrespective of salinity, high survival rates were observed at both 24 and 28 C, but variable growth rates were recorded. Contrary to L. vannamei, the Atlantic white shrimp, L. setiferus, which was reared for 28 d at 24 C only, had better growth performance at 8 g/L compared to 2, 16 and 32 g/L. Under equal experimental conditions, L. setiferus had considerably lower weight gain and survival than L. vannamei.

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