Activity patterns and temporal avoidance by prey in response to Sunda clouded leopard predation risk

Authors

  • J. Ross,

    Corresponding author
    1. Global Canopy Programme, Oxford, UK
    Current affiliation:
    1. Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Abingdon, UK
    • Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
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  • A. J. Hearn,

    1. Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    2. Global Canopy Programme, Oxford, UK
    Current affiliation:
    1. Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Abingdon, UK
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  • P. J. Johnson,

    1. Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
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  • D. W. Macdonald

    1. Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
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  • Editor: Nigel Bennett

Correspondence

Joanna Ross, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Tubney House, Abingdon Road, Tubney, Abingdon OX13 5QL, UK.

Email: joanna.ross@zoo.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Little is known about the activity patterns of Bornean ungulates, or the temporal interactions of these species with the Sunda clouded leopard Neofelis diardi. In this study, we use photographic capture data to quantify the activity patterns for the Sunda clouded leopard and six potential prey species: bearded pig Sus barbatus, Bornean yellow muntjac Muntiacus atherodes, red muntjac Muntiacus muntjak, lesser mouse deer Tragulus kanchil, greater mouse deer Tragulus napu, and sambar deer Rusa unicolor, and to calculate the overlap in activity patterns between these species. This is the first insight into the temporal interactions between the Sunda clouded leopard and its potential prey. Sunda clouded leopards' activity patterns overlapped most with those of sambar deer and greater mouse deer. In the absence of clouded leopards, we report a significant difference in activity patterns for bearded pigs which show greater nocturnal activity in the absence of this predator. This suggests that bearded pigs may be prey species for clouded leopards and they are capable of altering their activity pattern in response to this risk.

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