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Sperm competitiveness differs between two frog populations with different breeding systems

Authors

  • D. Álvarez,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ecology Unit, Department of Organisms and Systems Biology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain
    2. Research Unit of Biodiversity (UO-CSIC-PA), Mieres, Spain
    • Correspondence

      David Álvarez, C/Catedrático Rodrigo Uría s/n, Oviedo, Asturias 33071, Spain. Tel: +34-985223794; Fax: +34-985104866

      E-mail: dalvarezf@gmail.com

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  • L. Viesca,

    1. Ecology Unit, Department of Organisms and Systems Biology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain
    2. Research Unit of Biodiversity (UO-CSIC-PA), Mieres, Spain
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  • A. G. Nicieza

    1. Ecology Unit, Department of Organisms and Systems Biology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain
    2. Research Unit of Biodiversity (UO-CSIC-PA), Mieres, Spain
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  • Editor: Mark-Oliver Rödel

Abstract

In species with simultaneous polyandry, male-biased operational sex ratio is expected to increase the risk of sperm competition and thus sperm traits affecting siring success can differ among populations. Here, we test the hypothesis that high male–female ratios will enhance sperm competitiveness of Rana temporaria males. In this species, local populations can show either prolonged or explosive breeding. In a context of sperm competition and in controlled laboratory conditions, prolonged-breeding males sired a higher proportion of eggs than explosive-breeding males, regardless of female origin. This study demonstrates intrapopulation variation in siring success under a situation of sperm competition, consistent with the prolonged-explosive dichotomy of breeding strategies.

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