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Summary

This paper argues that two different worldviews may be identified in economics and hypothesizes about the origins of this differentiation. I argue that the differences in economic worldviews go beyond technical academic, methodological or ideological distinctions; instead, they may be related to both old conceptions of the two types of mind and some newer findings in cognitive neuroscience. In particular, I analyze the recent developments in economics from the brain lateralization point of view and argue that some salient trends in economic thought are largely compatible with the hypothesis of the increased left brain hemisphere dominance.