You have free access to this content

Letters in Applied Microbiology

Cover image for Vol. 57 Issue 5

November 2013

Volume 57, Issue 5

Pages 385–466

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cytotoxicity and mycotoxin production of shellfish-derived Penicillium spp., a risk for shellfish consumers (pages 385–392)

      M. Geiger, Y. Guitton, M. Vansteelandt, I. Kerzaon, E. Blanchet, T. Robiou du Pont, J.C. Frisvad, P. Hess, Y.F. Pouchus and O. Grovel

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: Penicillium strains isolated from bivalve molluscs produce extracts exhibiting a higher cytotoxicity than extracts from Penicillium strains isolated from the surrounding marine environment. The use of a mussel-based medium for cultures of some shellfish-derived strains enhances the cytotoxicity of extracts when compared with classical media. The production of cytotoxic compounds and of the mycotoxin patulin on such a host-derived medium highlights a potential health risk for shellfish consumers.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Regio-selectively reduced streptogramin A analogue, 5,6-dihydrovirginiamycin M1 exhibits improved potency against MRSA (pages 393–398)

      N.H. Hoang, N.L. Huong, A. Shrestha, J.K. Sohng, Y.J. Yoon and J.W. Park

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: This study demonstrates the expanded applicability of the unique bio-hydrogenation activity of Streptomyces venezuelae towards macrocyclic lactone streptogramin A antibiotic and evaluates the enhanced anti-MRSA activity of the bioconverted analogue. The unique bio-catalytic feature of S. venezuelae could contribute to the biosynthesis and reconstruction of diverse therapeutic resources, particularly as a promising scaffold tailoring tool for creating antimicrobial agents with possibly improved therapeutic effects.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Environmental persistence of vaccinia virus on materials (pages 399–404)

      J.P. Wood, Y.W. Choi, M.Q. Wendling, J.V. Rogers and D.J. Chappie

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: Smallpox is caused by the variola virus, and ranks as one of the most serious diseases that could originate from a biological weapon. However, limited data exist on the persistence of variola and related viruses (such as vaccinia, an established surrogate) on materials that may act as fomites. Persistence data are also inadequate for these viruses under controlled environmental conditions. The results from this study will fill some of these data gaps and may aid those responsible for infection control to make informed decisions regarding the need for decontamination after the release of a biological agent such as variola.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Fungal contamination and determination of fumonisins and aflatoxins in commercial feeds intended for ornamental birds in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (pages 405–411)

      B. Queiroz, C. M. Pereyra, K. M. Keller, T. Almeida, L. R. Cavaglieri, C. E. Magnoli and C. A. da Rocha Rosa

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: The mycotoxin contamination in ornamental birds is still poorly studied. There are limited numbers of reports about this subject. Most studies are still carried out in the poultry production. Due to potential contamination by fungi and mycotoxins in this feed, and the fact that there are limited data available in the world, the monitoring is highly relevant. Even if the amount of mycotoxins found is not enough to cause acute adverse effects, it is a sign that the feed will be less nutritious, and it will increase the risk of chronic mycotoxicoses. This is the first study supplying data on fungi and the occurrence of mycotoxins in Brazilian ornamental birds feed.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Dissipation of pirimiphos-methyl during wheat fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum (pages 412–419)

      T.M. Đorđević, S.S. Šiler-Marinković, R.D. Đurović-Pejčev, S.I. Dimitrijević-Branković and J.S. Gajić Umiljendić

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12128

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: Pesticide residues are an unavoidable part of the environment due to their extensive applications in agriculture. As wheat is a major cultivated cereal, the presence of pesticide residues in wheat is a real concern to human health. Reduction in pesticide residues during fermentation has been studied, but there is a lack of data regarding pesticide residues dissipation during cereal fermentation. Present work investigates the dissipation of pirimiphos-methyl during wheat fermentation by L. plantarum. Results are confirmation that food-processing techniques can significantly reduce the pesticide residues in food, offering a suitable means to tackle the current scenario of unsafe food.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Characteristics of purple nonsulfur bacteria grown under Stevia residue extractions (pages 420–426)

      J. Xu, Y. Feng, Y. Wang and X. Lin

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12129

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: This study first reported that the purple nonsulfur bacteria could grow well and possess high quality using Stevia residue extractions as carbon source. Those results suggest that wastewater of Stevia residue can be a favourable substrate for microbial growth, which can further provide desired bioresources for the application of downstream industry.

    6. You have free access to this content
      The effect of different isolation protocols on detection and molecular characterization of Campylobacter from poultry (pages 427–435)

      M. Ugarte-Ruiz, T.M. Wassenaar, S. Gómez-Barrero, M.C. Porrero, N. Navarro-Gonzalez and L. Domínguez

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12130

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of Study: The tracing of Campylobacter through the food chain remains important to control campylobacteriosis in humans. Our study points out that the isolation method used affects the genotypes obtained, and this should be considered as a variant when comparing the results of surveillance studies.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Association between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and total antioxidant status of patients with asymptomatic hepatitis C virus infection (pages 436–442)

      G. Akca, S. Tunçbilek and A. Sepici-Dinçel

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12131

      Significance and Impact of Study: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most studied viral agent and the common cause of the chronic liver diseases. It is generally asymptomatic and causes hepatic inflammation and tissue damage. Here, in this study, the potential hepatocellular damage due to the HCV was predicted by different metabolic pathways' biochemical markers such as total antioxidant status, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. This manuscript may not only raise awareness in dental patients, who are asymptomatic for HCV infection but also help predict any potential damage in liver tissue without using an invasive diagnostic method even if the patients have normal alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase records.

    8. You have free access to this content
      Assessment of in vitro removal of cholesterol oxidation products by Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 (pages 443–450)

      I.A. Machorro-Méndez, A. Hernández-Mendoza, V. Cardenia, M.T. Rodriguez-Estrada, G. Lercker, F. Spinelli, A. Cellini and H.S. García

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: The results of this work demonstrate for the first time the ability of a specific lactic acid bacterial strain to remove cholesterol oxidation products from an aqueous solution. This finding highlights the promising biological protective role of this bacterium as a potential removal agent of these toxic compounds.

    9. You have free access to this content
      Allelopathic effects of the extracts from an invasive species Solidago canadensis L. on Microcystis aeruginosa (pages 451–458)

      Y. Huang, Y. Bai, Y. Wang and H. Kong

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: This study investigated an invasive plant Solidago canadensis L. that could significantly inhibit the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. The alterations in physiology and biochemistry of M. aeruginosa cell were not in isolation, and the stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) could play a fundamental role in inhibitory effects of S. canadensis L. extracts. It was inferred that terrestrial plants could have the same algistatic mechanisms as hydrophytes. This study provided a new idea to utilize this weed as an algicide.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Cyanidiales diversity in Yellowstone National Park (pages 459–466)

      D.J. Skorupa, V. Reeb, R.W. Castenholz, D. Bhattacharya and T.R. McDermott

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Significance and Impact of the Study: The Cyanidiales are an order of unicellular eukaryotic algae that thrive in acidic geothermal environments. In this study, we report several novel observations relative to Cyanidiales ecology in Yellowstone National Park, including the following: (i) the identification of two phylogenetic lineages of Cyanidiales: Cyanidioschyzon and Galdieria; (ii) the absence of Galdieria in aquatic environments; (iii) the absence of Cyanidium and Galdieria phlegrea in prime Cyanidiales habitats; (iv) the cohabitation of Cyanidioschyzon and Galdieria in nonaqueous environments; and (v) the first in situ evidence regarding the relationship between soil moisture and Cyanidiales habitat preference and viability.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION