Letters in Applied Microbiology

Cover image for Vol. 58 Issue 2

February 2014

Volume 58, Issue 2

Pages 95–196

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Original Articles
    1. Postharvest transfer and survival of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis on living lettuce (pages 95–101)

      J.A. Waitt, D.D. Kuhn, G.E. Welbaum and M.A. Ponder

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12170

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: Hydroponically grown lettuce packaged in plastic clamshells with intact roots, marketed as ‘living lettuce’, is increasing in popularity due to its extended shelf life. This study demonstrates the transfer of Salmonella from contaminated worker hands and contaminated roots to leaves where it persisted at 4°C for 18 day. Temperature abuse (12°C) increased Salmonella on roots and leaves. These findings suggest that failure to maintain temperatures below 12°C can pose a risk for consumers purchasing living lettuce at markets where recommended storage temperatures are not maintained.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Original Articles
    1. Isolation and partial characterization of bacteria (Pseudoalteromonas sp.) with potential antibacterial activity from a marine costal environment from New Caledonia (pages 102–108)

      R. Dufourcq, E. Chalkiadakis, M. Fauchon, E. Deslandes, V. Kerjean, S. Chanteau, E. Petit, J. Guezennec and M. Dupont-Rouzeyrol

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12162

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: With the constant increasing of bacterial resistance against known antibiotics in worldwide public health, it is now necessary to find new sources of antimicrobials. Marine bacteria from New Caledonia were isolated, tested for antibacterial activity and characterized to find new active molecules against multidrug-resistant bacteria. This study illustrates the diversity of the marine ecosystem with potent new bacteria species. Also the potential of marine bacteria as a rich source of bioactive molecule, for example antibiotics, is highlighted.

    2. Effect of a sublethal high-pressure homogenization treatment on the fatty acid membrane composition of probiotic lactobacilli (pages 109–117)

      G. Tabanelli, F. Patrignani, F. Gardini, G. Vinderola, J. Reinheimer, L. Grazia and R. Lanciotti

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12164

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: This study contributed to understand the response mechanisms activated in cells exposed to pressure stress. It has been demonstrated that high-pressure homogenization (HPH) treatments, conducted at sublethal levels, could increase some important functional and technological characteristics of nonintestinal probiotic strains. The findings of this paper can contribute to elucidate the mechanisms through which these treatments can modify these strain probiotic properties that are related to outermost cell structures, also principal target of HPH.

    3. Stability and purity of a bacteriophage cocktail preparation for nebulizer delivery (pages 118–122)

      C.J. Cooper, S.P. Denyer and J.-Y. Maillard

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12161

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: With increasing reports of bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the lack of new antibiotics being produced, bacteriophage therapy is becoming an attractive alternative. There has been no published report on the quality assurance of bacteriophage product to date. This is the first study on the quality assurance of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage cocktail following pharmacopoeial requirements. The presence of bacterial endotoxin was found to be the key stumbling block for meeting regulatory criteria.

    4. Isolation of a rice endophytic bacterium, Pantoea sp. Sd-1, with ligninolytic activity and characterization of its rice straw degradation ability (pages 123–129)

      X. Q. Xiong, H. D. Liao, J. S. Ma, X. M. Liu, L. Y. Zhang, X. W. Shi, X. L. Yang, X. N. Lu and Y. H. Zhu

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12163

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: Rice straw, an abundant agricultural by-product in China, is very difficult to degrade because of its high lignin content. Due to the immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility of bacteria, endophytic bacteria are useful resources for biodegradation. In this study, we screened for endophytic bacteria capable of biodegrading rice straw and lignin and obtained one strain, Pantoea sp. Sd-1, with suitable characteristics. Sd-1 could be used for degradation of rice straw and lignin, and may play an important role in biodegradation of this agricultural by-product.

    5. Plant growth-promoting potential of bacteria isolated from active volcano sites of Barren Island, India (pages 130–137)

      N. Amaresan, K. Kumar, K. Sureshbabu and K. Madhuri

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12165

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: The present research shows diverse plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria could be isolated from the active volcano site and suggests that volcano sites represent an ecological niche, which harbours a diverse and hitherto largely uncharacterized microbial population with yet unknown and untapped potential biotechnological applications, for example, plant growth promoters, as evidenced from this study. The outcome of this research may have a practical effect on crop production methodologies in saline and arid environment soils.

    6. Diversity of cultivable β-glycosidase-producing micro-organisms isolated from the soil of a ginseng field and their ginsenosides-hydrolysing activity (pages 138–144)

      Y. Fu, Z. Yin, L. Wu and C. Yin

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12166

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: This is the first study to provide information of cultivable β-glycosidase-producing micro-organisms in ginseng field soil. The strain GS 09 has potential to be applied on the preparation for minor ginsenoside C-K in pharmaceutical industry.

    7. Emergence of Vibrio cholerae O1 classical biotype in 2012 in Iran (pages 145–149)

      B. Bakhshi, M. Boustanshenas and A. Mahmoudi-aznaveh

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12167

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: Emergence of V. cholerae with Classical biotype after at least one decade in Iran is alarming due to fear of expansion of V. cholerae strains with high virulence potential and signifies the need to monitor and analyze all new cases in countries with cholera outbreaks or even sporadic cases as this could conceivably affect the neighbouring countries and may expose the world to the seventh pandemic with Classical biotype strains.

    8. Postantibiotic effect and postantibiotic sub-minimum inhibitory concentration effect of valnemulin against Staphylococcus aureus isolates from swine and chickens (pages 150–155)

      D.H. Zhao, Y. Yu, Y.F. Zhou, W. Shi, H. Deng and Y.H. Liu

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12168

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: In this study, valnemulin demonstrated prolonged postantibiotic effects and postantibiotic sub-MIC effects on strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The strains with identical MICs of valnemulin exhibited different PAEs and PA-SMEs. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from different species has little impact on the postantibiotic effect of valnemulin. The result suggests a longer dosing interval while formulating a daily administration dosage, and it may play a valuable role of valnemulin in treating Staph. aureus infections in animals.

    9. Antilisterial activity of lactose monolaurate in milk, drinkable yogurt and cottage cheese (pages 156–162)

      Y. Chen, B. Nummer and M.K. Walsh

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12169

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: A novel sugar ester, lactose monolaurate, inhibited the growth of a five-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in milk, yogurt and cottage cheese. This is the first report of the use of a sugar ester to inhibit the growth of Listeria in food systems.

    10. A sensitive and specific nanoparticle-assisted PCR assay for rapid detection of porcine parvovirus (pages 163–167)

      Y. Cui, Z. Wang, X. Ma, J. Liu and S. Cui

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12171

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: Nanoparticle-assisted polymerase chain reaction (nanoPCR) assay is an improved PCR. NanoPCR is highly sensitive and specific because the nanofluids formed in the nanobuffer have high thermal conductivity, which reduces the time required to reach the target temperature. It is more sensitive than conventional PCR, and it could detect the cases earlier than conventional PCR. This report describes the first application of the highly efficient nanoPCR technology for the detection of porcine parvovirus (PPV). The PPV nanoPCR assay will be useful for the detection and study of PPV and will also be applicable to improve the detection of other viruses.

    11. Phenotypic traits, virulence-associated gene profile and genetic relatedness of Edwardsiella tarda isolates from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica in Korea (pages 168–176)

      K.I. Kim, J.Y. Kang, J.Y. Park, S.J. Joh, H.S. Lee and Y.K. Kwon

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12172

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: Based on the biochemical characteristics, the phylogenetic property of the 16S rRNA gene and PFGE types of Edwardsiella tarda, we could identify the intraspecific diversity of isolates from Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica in Korea. In addition, this study describes the strong congruence of virulence-related genes and pathogenicity, suggesting that the virulence profile may be useful tool for prediction of pathogenicity.

    12. A fluorescence-based method coupled with Disruptor filtration for rapid detection of F + RNA phages (pages 177–183)

      Y. Yang and M. W. Griffiths

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12173

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: A fluorescent method coupled with Disruptor filtration was evaluated for the first time to rapidly detect low numbers of F + RNA phages. Rapid detection of F + RNA phages provides an effective way to monitor faecal contamination of environmental water and thus helps prevent contamination of fresh produce via irrigation.

    13. Antibacterial and antiviral evaluation of sulfonoquinovosyldiacylglyceride: a glycolipid isolated from Azadirachta indica leaves (pages 184–189)

      Y.P. Bharitkar, S. Bathini, D. Ojha, S. Ghosh, H. Mukherjee, K. Kuotsu, D. Chattopadhyay and N.B. Mondal

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12174

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: The water-soluble metabolite sulfonoquinovosyldiacylglyceride (SQDG) isolated from Azadirachta indica (Neem) possess significant antibacterial as well as anti-HSV activity. The efficacies as well as the solubility factor of SQDG substantiate a greater attention for its use as phytotherapeutic drug for controlling microbial infections as most consumers have better acceptance of phytomedicines than synthetic drugs.

    14. Enterotoxin gene profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from milk and dairy products in Italy (pages 190–196)

      D.M. Bianchi, S. Gallina, A. Bellio, F. Chiesa, T. Civera and L. Decastelli

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/lam.12182

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      Significance and Impact of the Study: The analyses targeted 11 staphylococcal enterotoxins genes and 35 different enterotoxin gene profiles were distinguished among the isolates. A total of 255 Staph. aureus isolates were positive for one or more SE genes while ser gene was the most prevalent. In 93% of the isolates bearing genes located on the enterotoxin gene cluster (= 89), both seg and sei genes were present.

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