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The effect of coffee consumption on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis B virus endemic area

Authors

  • Eun Sun Jang,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Sook-Hyang Jeong,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Sang Hyub Lee,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Sung Ho Hwang,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • So Yeon Ahn,

    1. Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Jaebong Lee,

    1. Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Young Soo Park,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Jin Hyoek Hwang,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Jin-Wook Kim,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Nayoung Kim,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Dong Ho Lee,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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  • Hyun Young Kim

    1. Health Promotion Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si, Korea
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Correspondence

Sook-Hyang Jeong, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bungdang Hospital, 82, Gumi-ro 173 beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707, Korea

Tel: +82 31 787 7029

Fax: +82 31 787 4052

e-mail: jsh@snubh.org

Abstract

Background & Aims

Coffee consumption is inversely related to the risk of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the protective effect of coffee drinking against the risk of HCC was not established in HBV-prevalent region. To elucidate the relationship between lifetime coffee consumption and the risk of HCC development under the consideration of replication status of HBV.

Methods

A hospital-based case–control study was performed in 1364 subjects. A total of 258 HCC patients, 480 health-check examinees (control 1, HCE) and 626 patients with chronic liver disease other than HCC (control 2, CLD) were interviewed on smoking, alcohol and coffee drinking using a standardized questionnaire. HBV e-antigen (HBeAg) status and serum HBV DNA levels were measured in patients infected with HBV.

Results

After adjustment for age, gender, obesity, DM, presence of hepatitis virus (except for HCE) and lifetime alcohol drinking/smoking, a high lifetime coffee consumption (≥20 000 cups) was an independent protective factor against HCC, in each analyses using healthy and risky control groups respectively (HCE group, OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.33–0.95; CLD group, OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36–0.85). However, the high coffee consumption did not affect the HCC risk in patients with HBV (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.36–1.14) after adjustment for HBeAg status, serum HBV DNA level and antiviral therapy.

Conclusions

A high lifetime coffee consumption was negatively associated with a HCC development. However, this difference of coffee exposure with the HCC group was reduced in chronic hepatitis B patients by the dominant role of viral replication.

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