Optimizing treatment for HCV genotype 4: PEG-IFN alfa 2a vs. PEG-IFN alfa 2b; the debate continues

Authors

  • Gamal Esmat,

    Corresponding author
    1. Endemic Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
    2. Tropical Medicine Department, National Hepatology & Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt
    • Correspondence

      Gamal Esmat, MD, Endemic Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

      Tel: +202 235728360; +202 235676138

      Fax: +202 235728131; +202 23682774

      e-mail: gesmat@gamalesmat.com

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  • Mohamed El Kassas,

    1. Tropical Medicine Department, National Hepatology & Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt
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  • Mohamed Hassany,

    1. Tropical Medicine Department, National Hepatology & Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt
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  • Mohamed Gamil,

    1. Tropical Medicine Department, National Hepatology & Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt
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  • Maissa El Raziky

    1. Endemic Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
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Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Combined therapy with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin is the current standard of care treatment for HCV genotype 4. Two types of PEG-IFN are commercially available. The limited number of trials that were conducted for HCV genotype 4 and the few head to head comparisons make it impossible to know which is the best option? In this article we review all available PEG-IFN trials performed worldwide for HCV genotype 4 since 2004. Unless another molecule is developed as a standalone for the treatment of HCV, PEG-IFN will continue to be a source of debate.

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