Get access

Occult hepatitis B virus infection predicts de novo hepatitis B infection in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis after liver transplantation

Authors

  • Man Xie,

    1. Liver Research Center, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
    2. Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine in Liver Cirrhosis, Beijing, China
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
  • Wei Rao,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
  • Tao Yang,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yonglin Deng,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hong Zheng,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cheng Pan,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yihe Liu,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Zhongyang Shen,

    1. Organ Transplantation Department, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin, China
    2. Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Tianjin, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jidong Jia

    Corresponding author
    1. Liver Research Center, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
    2. Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine in Liver Cirrhosis, Beijing, China
    • Correspondence

      Jidong Jia, MD, PhD. Liver Research Center, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-an Road, Xi-Cheng District, Beijing 100050, China

      Tel: (86 10) 6313 9816

      Fax: (8610) 83165944

      e-mail: jiajdmd@126.com

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background & Aims

Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) is a suspected source of de novo hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection after LT. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of OBI in liver transplant recipients with alcoholic cirrhosis and demonstrate the association between OBI and de novo HBV infection after LT in these patients.

Methods

Forty-three patients with alcoholic cirrhosis who were negative for HBsAg before LT were recruited in this retrospective study. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded native liver tissues and quantified for HBV DNA by real-time PCR. Correlation between de novo HBV infection after LT (positive HBsAg and/or detectable HBV DNA in serum) and detection of intrahepatic HBV DNA before LT was analysed.

Results

Detectable HBV DNA in the explanted liver was found in 41.9% (18/43) of the patients and was thus defined as OBI, which was correlated with the presence of serum hepatitis B core antibody (P = 0.008). De novo HBV infection occurred in 18.6% (8/43) of the recipients at a median of 10 months after LT. The rate of de novo HBV infection was 38.9% (7/18) in patients with OBI, compared with 4% (1/25) in patients without OBI (P = 0.004). Furthermore, de novo HBV infection was inversely correlated with the presence of hepatitis B surface antibody in recipients with OBI (P = 0.026).

Conclusion

With a prevalence of 41.9% in liver transplant recipients with alcoholic cirrhosis, OBI in the native liver can predict de novo HBV infection after LT.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary